Welcome Colegio Americano del Sur

March 01, 2012

Homework: Map of the Middle East

from:King, Sean Ryan

to:Social Studies 10, A

Draw a physical map of the Middle East. This map is not political, meaning do not draw the country lines, because the countries that exist now did not exist thousands of years ago.  Your map must incude:

The Tigris and Euphrates rivers

The Black, Mediterranian, Caspian, Red, and Arabian Sea and the Persia Gulf

The ancient cities of Ur (where the Tigris and Euphrates meet), Babylon (modern-day Baghdad), Jerusalem, Bethleham (right below Jerusalem), Damascus, Mecca, Medina, and Istanbul

The Arabian Desert (most of the Arabian desert) and the Hindu Kush (the mountain range that divides the Middle East from India)

March 01, 2012

Classwork for 1/3

from:King, Sean Ryan

to:Language 12

Read these three Haiku and write you think a Haiku (a form of poetry) is.  Prepare to write a four-verse haiku (due next tuesday) about something in either science or nature.

On a journey, ill:                                
my dream will go wandering                  
over withered fields. 

-Basho                       

Blow if you will,                               
autumn wind...all the flowers                         
have faded, fallen.                               

- Gansan

Earth, wood, and metal...                               
although my breathing ceases              
time and tide go on.                           

-Atsujin

March 01, 2012

Classwork for 1/3

from:King, Sean Ryan

to:Language-HS, Level 4

Read these two Japanese death Haiku and write what you think two of them are saying about life and death.  Prepare to write a haiku (due next tuesday) about your thoughts on either birth or death.

On a journey, ill:                                 
my dream will go wandering                   
over withered fields.  

-Basho                        

Blow if you will,                                
autumn wind...all the flowers                          
have faded, fallen.                                

- Gansan

Earth, wood, and metal...                                
although my breathing ceases               
time and tide go on.                            

-Atsujin

March 01, 2012

Homework: Map of the Middle East

from:King, Sean Ryan

to:Social Studies 10, B

Draw a physical map of the Middle East. This map is not political, meaning do not draw the country lines, because the countries that exist now did not exist thousands of years ago.  Your map must incude:

The Tigris and Euphrates rivers

The Black, Mediterranian, Caspian, Red, and Arabian Sea and the Persia Gulf

The ancient cities of Ur (where the Tigris and Euphrates meet), Babylon (modern-day Baghdad), Jerusalem, Bethleham (right below Jerusalem), Damascus, Mecca, Medina, and Istanbul

The Arabian Desert (most of the Arabian desert) and the Hindu Kush (the mountain range that divides the Middle East from India)

Feb. 29, 2012

Classwork for 29/2:

from:King, Sean Ryan

to:Language 12

Read the following poem by Walt Whitman and write AT LEAST three sentences explaing (1) What he is saying about science, (2) what he is saying about nature, and (3) if you agree with what he is saying about science and nature.

When finished, begin thinking about your next poem, about either science or nature, which needs to be at least 100 words and contain two new words you have never used before.

When I Heard the Learn’d Astronomer
By Walt Whitman
When I heard the learn’d astronomer,
When the proofs, the figures, were ranged in columns before me,
When I was shown the charts and diagrams, to add, divide, and measure them,
When I sitting heard the astronomer where he lectured with much applause in the lecture-room,
How soon unaccountable I became tired and sick,
Till rising and gliding out I wander’d off by myself,
In the mystical moist night-air, and from time to time,
Look’d up in perfect silence at the stars.

Feb. 29, 2012

Music History: Final Project Guidelines

from:King, Sean Ryan

to:Hist. American Music, B

Write a 2-4 page (double-spaced) paper on one musical act, be it band or solo artist.  You must explain the following using your best spelling and grammar:

(1) Which genre or genres this artist is in, including a definition of the genre or genres (2+ sentences)

(2) The origins of that artist or band, including the reported meaning of their name (3+ sentences)

(3) Describe three musical, philosophical, or historical influences on that artist (6+ sentences)

(4) Write verses from one song of that artist and describe the meaning of that song in detail, focusing on individual verses (8+ sentences)

(5) The importance of this artist or band, either to music history or your own personal history (5+ sentences)

Citing sources: You can and should cite sources for your information.  You can quote or paraphrase, but do not take any information or use anybody’s words without citing the source.  For this assignment, all you need to do to cite the source is put the book or website you got the information from in parenthesis after the citation.  For example, (www.wikipedia.com/human_intestinal_growth) or (The Things They Carried by Tim O’Brien).  You are required to use TWO sources, though I would recommend using more.

Feb. 29, 2012

Music History: Final Project Guidelines

from:King, Sean Ryan

to:Hist. American Music, A

 

Write a 2-4 page (double-spaced) paper on one musical act, be it band or solo artist.  You must explain the following using your best spelling and grammar:

(1) Which genre or genres this artist is in, including a definition of the genre or genres (2+ sentences)

(2) The origins of that artist or band, including the reported meaning of their name (3+ sentences)

(3) Describe three musical, philosophical, or historical influences on that artist (6+ sentences)

(4) Write verses from one song of that artist and describe the meaning of that song in detail, focusing on individual verses (8+ sentences)

(5) The importance of this artist or band, either to music history or your own personal history (5+ sentences)

Citing sources: You can and should cite sources for your information.  You can quote or paraphrase, but do not take any information or use anybody’s words without citing the source.  For this assignment, all you need to do to cite the source is put the book or website you got the information from in parenthesis after the citation.  For example, (www.wikipedia.com/human_intestinal_growth) or (The Things They Carried by Tim O’Brien).  You are required to use TWO sources, though I would recommend using more.

Feb. 29, 2012

Music History: Final Project Guidelines

from:King, Sean Ryan

to:Hist. American Music, A

Write a 2-4 page (double-spaced) paper on one musical act, be it band or solo artist.  You must explain the following using your best spelling and grammar:

(1) Which genre or genres this artist is in, including a definition of the genre or genres (2+ sentences)

(2) The origins of that artist or band, including the reported meaning of their name (3+ sentences)

(3) Describe three musical, philosophical, or historical influences on that artist (6+ sentences)

(4) Write verses from one song of that artist and describe the meaning of that song in detail, focusing on individual verses (8+ sentences)

(5) The importance of this artist or band, either to music history or your own personal history (5+ sentences)

Citing sources: You can and should cite sources for your information.  You can quote or paraphrase, but do not take any information or use anybody’s words without citing the source.  For this assignment, all you need to do to cite the source is put the book or website you got the information from in parenthesis after the citation.  For example, (www.wikipedia.com/human_intestinal_growth) or (The Things They Carried by Tim O’Brien).  You are required to use TWO sources, though I would recommend using more.

Feb. 29, 2012

Music History: Final Project Guidelines

from:King, Sean Ryan

to:Hist. American Music, A

 

Write a 2-4 page (double-spaced) paper on one musical act, be it band or solo artist.  You must explain the following using your best spelling and grammar:

(1) Which genre or genres this artist is in, including a definition of the genre or genres (2+ sentences)

(2) The origins of that artist or band, including the reported meaning of their name (3+ sentences)

(3) Describe three musical, philosophical, or historical influences on that artist (6+ sentences)

(4) Write verses from one song of that artist and describe the meaning of that song in detail, focusing on individual verses (8+ sentences)

(5) The importance of this artist or band, either to music history or your own personal history (5+ sentences)

Citing sources: You can and should cite sources for your information.  You can quote or paraphrase, but do not take any information or use anybody’s words without citing the source.  For this assignment, all you need to do to cite the source is put the book or website you got the information from in parenthesis after the citation.  For example, (www.wikipedia.com/human_intestinal_growth) or (The Things They Carried by Tim O’Brien).  You are required to use TWO sources, though I would recommend using more.

Feb. 29, 2012

Psychology Homework for 29/2

from:King, Sean Ryan

to:Psychology 12

Read the following article and answer the five questions at the bottom IN COMPLETE SENTENCES. 

How Smart Is the Octopus?

By Carl Zimmer

Aristotle didn't have a high opinion of the octopus. "The octopus is a stupid creature," he wrote, "for it will approach a man's hand if it be lowered in the water." Twenty-four centuries later, this "stupid" creature is enjoying a much better reputation. YouTube is loaded with evidence of what some might call octopus intelligence. One does an uncanny impression of a flounder. Another mimics coral before darting away from a pushy camera. A third slips its arms around a jar, unscrews it, and dines on the crab inside. Scientific journals publish research papers on octopus learning, octopus personality, octopus memory. Now the octopus has even made it into the pages of the journal Consciousness and Cognition (along with its fellow cephalopods the squid and the cuttlefish). The title: "Cephalopod consciousness: behavioral evidence."

So, is the octopus really all that smart? It depends on how you define intelligence. And if you've got a good definition, there are quite a few scientists who would love to hear it. Octopuses can learn, they can process complex information in their heads, and they can behave in equally complex ways. But it would be a mistake to try to give octopuses an IQ score. They are not intelligent in the way we are—not because they're dumb but because their behavior is the product of hundreds of millions of years of evolution under radically different conditions than the ones under which our own brains evolved.

You'd have to go back about 700 million years to find the moment in the history of life when humans and octopuses diverged. Our most recent common ancestor, scientists suspect, was a little wormlike creature with eyespots and little more. Since then, our lineage evolved bones; theirs evolved boneless bodies they control with water pressure. We've accumulated so many and such incredible differences over that time that 20th-century scientists were excited to discover a few deep similarities. In the 1950s, for example, biologists demonstrated for the first time that octopuses have massive brains.

Cephalopods belong to the same lineage that produced snails, clams, and other mollusks. A typical mollusk might have 20,000 neurons arranged in a diffuse net. The octopus has half a billion neurons. *  The neurons in its head are massed into complex lobes, much the way our own brains are. In comparison with their body weight, octopuses have the biggest brains of all invertebrates. They're even bigger than the brains of fish and amphibians, putting them on par with those of birds and mammals.

In the late 1950s, Oxford biologist N.S. Sutherland decided to put the big brains of octopuses to the test. He would show them two shapes and reward them for touching one but not the other. They might learn to tell a rectangle in a horizontal position from the same rectangle rotated 90 degrees. And once they had figured out this test, the octopuses knew to select any horizontal rectangle they saw, no matter what its particular dimensions. They were learning what to learn.

Over the years, octopuses have shown many more signs of intelligence. They proved to have an excellent memory. They were clever and unpredictable. Jennifer Mather, a Canadian biologist, has tossed toys into octopus tanks and watched as the octopuses inspect them and puff them around with jets of water. *  They are playing, she argues. Clams do not play. Humans do.

Mather is also the author of the new paper arguing for consciousness in octopuses. She does not claim that they have full-blown consciousness like we do but a simpler form known as primary consciousness. In other words, they can combine their perceptions with their memories to have a coherent feel for what's happening to them at any moment. Mather bases her claim not just on how octopuses behave but also on how their brains work.

For example, one sign of the complexity of the human brain is that we can be left-handed or right-handed. Our preference comes from one side of the brain dominating over the other—a sign of how the two sides of our brains are not identical. Instead, they divide up mental work and communicate with each other to create a unified sense of reality. Octopuses may not be left-handed (or left-armed), but Mather claims that they show similar kinds of specialization with their eyes. In a 2004 experiment, she and her colleagues found that when they looked out from their dens, some preferred to sit with their left eye facing out, others with their right.

But some octopus experts are skeptical of these bold claims. Many reports of weird octopus behavior come from casual observations in aquariums. Even some experiments have not held up to scrutiny. Last year, Jean Boal of Millersville University and her colleagues found fault with Mather's experiments on left- and right-brained octopuses. The problem was that the scientists had looked at too few octopuses. It was impossible to rule out the possibility that octopuses might not have any preference at all for either eye. The results of the experiments might simply have been a matter of chance.

After 50 years, in other words, we still don't know that much about what's going on in the heads of octopuses. Carefully designed experiments will be essential for finding out more, but so will a more octo-centric attitude. What we call intelligence is really just a set of behaviors and abilities that evolved in our ancestors as they adapted to a particular way of life. Octopuses evolved behaviors of their own, but they were adapting to a way of life that's hard for us to imagine—they were naked mollusks in a world of fish.

Jean Boal and her colleagues have done some experiments that show how good octopuses are at learning geography. Boal put the octopuses in tanks with an assortment of landmarks, such as plastic jugs, plates of pebbles, and clumps of algae. It took only a few trials for the octopuses to find the quickest route to a hidden exit in the bottom of the tank. What made Boal's results particularly impressive is that the octopuses were learning two completely different mazes at once. Boal would move them from one to the other after each trial. Somehow, the octopuses could keep track of two geographies concurrently. When octopuses are moving across new terrain, they can perhaps learn the best escape from predators.

There's not much point in trying to pin octopus behavior to some human-based scale of intelligence, because our behavior emerged as apes adapted to life spent on two legs, in groups, and using our hands to make tools. We'd fail pretty badly at an octopus-based test of intelligence, but surely we wouldn't hold it against ourselves.

 

1. What is intelligence, according to the article?

2. What is unique about the brains of octopi?

3. How does the article define consciousness (self-awareness)?

4. That are three unique things that octopi do that most other animals do not?

5. What is the difference between human and octopi intelligence?

Feb. 21, 2012

Book Report Grading Rubric

from:Speirs, Ashlee

to:Language-E, Intermediate

I have added the grading rubric to the book report assignment. Please take a look as it will help your writing. Miss Ashlee

Feb. 14, 2012

Wednesday, February 15, 2012

from:Elser, Robert

to:All Students

Hey folks!  Don´t forget your newspaper article and summary to be presented tomorrow in class!  be prepared and remember...today is the first day of the rest of your life!

Feb. 08, 2012

My Favorite Music

from:Elser, Robert

to:All Students

Make sure you finish the 5 paragraph essay on music.  For all of you who have not submitted this, you have until this evening.  Be prepared for next week with your current event article and summary.  This should be at least 10 sentences in one paragraph, hard copy.  

Jan. 25, 2012

What I Believe

from:Elser, Robert

to:All Students

Dear Students,

Todays homework assignment will be the writing of a 3 paragraph essay.  This essay must be at least 150 words.  The title is: What I Believe.  Attached is the text, How to Write an Essay and also attached is the grading rubric that will be used. Make sure you structure your essay as instructed. 

Sincerely,

Mr Elser

Jan. 18, 2012

Introduction to Writing Skills

from:Elser, Robert

to:All Students

Dear Students,

It was great meeting everyone on Wednesday!  I look forward to meeting again on Wednesday the 25th of January.  Please be prepared and do not be late!

Sincerely,

 

Mr. Elser

Oct. 20, 2011

EXAM CONTENTS

from:Alvarez, Claudia Mersedes

to:Language-MS, Intermediate B

1. VOCABULARY

2. PAST PERFECT

3. PRESENT PERFECT

4. FUTURE PERFECT

5. PAST PERFECT PROGRESSIVE

6. PRESENT PERFECT PROGRESSIVE

7. FUTURE PERFECT PROGRESSIVE

8. LISTENING COMPREHENSION

9. READING COMPREHENSION

10.  WRITING SKILLS

Oct. 12, 2011

Work October 13th

from:Alvarez, Claudia Mersedes

to:Language-MS, Intermediate B

Hello guys!

Please work on the following things in your day off!
Please remember to keep safe!

Hello guys!
This is what you have to do for FRIDAY.

1. Finish the 80 FLASHCARDS.

2. MAKE A BOX, where you can put all your flashcards.

3. STUDY YOUR LINES. We will be presenting on TUESDAY to all MIDDLE SCHOOL.

4. Study perfect and perfect progressive tenses.

5. QUIZ ON FRIDAY.

Oct. 12, 2011

Activities for October 13

from:Alvarez, Claudia Mersedes

to:Language-HS, Beginners

Hello guys! 

This is what you have to do for FRIDAY. 

1. Finish the 90 FLASHCARDS. 

2. MAKE A BOX, where you can put all your flashcards. 

3. STUDY YOUR LINES. OTHELLO AND THE CLICKE.  We will be presenting on MONDAY to Mr. Klassen's class. 

4. Study perfect and perfect progressive tenses. 

5. QUIZ ON FRIDAY.