Welcome Crosspointe Academy

Nov. 07, 2014

Friday Chemistry

from:Hommen, Heather

to:Chemistry

We had a small revision in todays assignment.

Students need to read pgs 133-136.

I will hand out next weeks revised assignments on Monday.

We will NOT have Chemistry Lab on Thursday November 13th due to guest speaker coming.

Blessings and Joy!!

 

Sept. 19, 2014

Friday's Assignment

from:Hommen, Heather

to:Algebra w/Financial Applications

The Cost of Borrowing Money Interest and fees charged on a loan have the effect of increasing the cost of an object or service purchased with credit. Various methods which are used to calculate interest rates can mislead a borrower about the actual cost of a loan. The interest rate that you pay to borrow money is influenced by numerous factors relating to the type of loan that you choose. The length of time over which a loan is to be repaid, the collateral, your credit history, and the lender that you select are all important aspects of the interest rate that you’ll be charged. However, rates are also influenced by factors outside the control of both the borrower and lender and unrelated to the specifics of a particular loan. Here are some of the key influences that go into determining the interest rate that you’ll pay: •Economic conditions have an important influence on overall interest rates. Rates tend to increase during periods of strong economic activity when the demand for credit is high. A vital and healthy economy causes businesses to borrow funds in order to expand their output. At the same time, high employment rates and wage increases which accompany economic expansion usually make consumers more optimistic, leading them to buy more goods and services on credit. This increased demand for credit results in higher prices paid, in the form of interest rates, for that credit. On the other hand, a weak economy does little to stimulate demand for credit by businesses or consumers. Industries operating at less-than-capacity along with rising unemployment cause cautiousness and cutbacks in spending and borrowing. The light demand for credit during these periods tends to drive interest rates downward. •The inflationary expectations of consumers and businesses can have a major impact on interest rates. Lenders who foresee rising prices for goods and services will charge higher interest rates in order to compensate for the likelihood that their loans will be repaid with devalued dollars. At the same time potential borrowers, who are also anticipating rising inflation rates, are more likely to accept higher-interest loans because they expect to be able to pay them back with devalued dollars. The anticipation of rising inflation also stimulates consumers and businesses to buy as soon as possible in order to beat the expected price increases, placing more of a demand on credit which, in turn, drives interest rates upward. •Policies and actions of the federal government can also be a major influence on interest rates. Large federal deficits that occur when expenditures exceed tax revenues require the government to annually borrow tens or hundreds of billions of dollars, which causes tremendous strains on the credit markets by taking lendable funds away from businesses and consumers. This increases the demand for credit and exerts upward pressure on interest rates. The federal government continually intervenes directly in the credit markets to influence interest rates and guide the nation’s economic activity. This is done by the Federal Reserve Board (also known as the Fed), an independent agency headed by presidential appointees which acts as a banker to commercial banks. The Fed uses several tools to influence the credit markets: 1) the discount rate, which is the interest rate that commercial banks must pay when they borrow from the Fed. A change in the discount rate is likely to cause commercial banks to change the interest rates that they charge on loans made to businesses and individual borrowers. 2) The buying and selling of Treasury securities in the financial markets. These transactions have a major impact on the supply of money, credit availability, and interest rates. A large purchase of Treasuries by the Fed causes new funds to be injected into the banking system, which then has more money to lend, leading to lower interest rates. On the other hand, a large sale of Treasury securities takes money out of the banking system, causing banks to curtail lending by raising rates. 3) Public announcements by members of the Fed. For example, if a board member states that the Fed is concerned about rising inflation, interest rates are likely to rise in anticipation of the Fed’s efforts to restrict credit. •A loan’s term, or maturity length, generally affects the rate of interest that will be charged. Loans with longer maturities typically have higher interest rates. A thirty-year home mortgage loan is likely to have a higher interest rate than a fifteen-year loan on the same property for the same amount. And a five-year car loan will carry a higher rate than a three-year loan. In short, a longer repayment period places the lender at greater risk. •A borrower’s collateral can have a major impact on the interest rate charged by a lender. Collateral places the lender in a more secure financial position. In the event that the borrower doesn’t repay the loan, the lender can force the sale of the collateral in order to recoup any losses incurred. This lessens the risk to the lender, which should result in a reduced interest rate. Read more: http://www.finweb.com/banking-credit/the-cost-of-borrowing-money.html#ixzz3DivDYW00

Sept. 18, 2014

Friday's Assignment

from:Hommen, Heather

to:Algebra w/Financial Applications

The Cost of Borrowing Money Interest and fees charged on a loan have the effect of increasing the cost of an object or service purchased with credit. Various methods which are used to calculate interest rates can mislead a borrower about the actual cost of a loan. The interest rate that you pay to borrow money is influenced by numerous factors relating to the type of loan that you choose. The length of time over which a loan is to be repaid, the collateral, your credit history, and the lender that you select are all important aspects of the interest rate that you’ll be charged. However, rates are also influenced by factors outside the control of both the borrower and lender and unrelated to the specifics of a particular loan. Here are some of the key influences that go into determining the interest rate that you’ll pay: •Economic conditions have an important influence on overall interest rates. Rates tend to increase during periods of strong economic activity when the demand for credit is high. A vital and healthy economy causes businesses to borrow funds in order to expand their output. At the same time, high employment rates and wage increases which accompany economic expansion usually make consumers more optimistic, leading them to buy more goods and services on credit. This increased demand for credit results in higher prices paid, in the form of interest rates, for that credit. On the other hand, a weak economy does little to stimulate demand for credit by businesses or consumers. Industries operating at less-than-capacity along with rising unemployment cause cautiousness and cutbacks in spending and borrowing. The light demand for credit during these periods tends to drive interest rates downward. •The inflationary expectations of consumers and businesses can have a major impact on interest rates. Lenders who foresee rising prices for goods and services will charge higher interest rates in order to compensate for the likelihood that their loans will be repaid with devalued dollars. At the same time potential borrowers, who are also anticipating rising inflation rates, are more likely to accept higher-interest loans because they expect to be able to pay them back with devalued dollars. The anticipation of rising inflation also stimulates consumers and businesses to buy as soon as possible in order to beat the expected price increases, placing more of a demand on credit which, in turn, drives interest rates upward. •Policies and actions of the federal government can also be a major influence on interest rates. Large federal deficits that occur when expenditures exceed tax revenues require the government to annually borrow tens or hundreds of billions of dollars, which causes tremendous strains on the credit markets by taking lendable funds away from businesses and consumers. This increases the demand for credit and exerts upward pressure on interest rates. The federal government continually intervenes directly in the credit markets to influence interest rates and guide the nation’s economic activity. This is done by the Federal Reserve Board (also known as the Fed), an independent agency headed by presidential appointees which acts as a banker to commercial banks. The Fed uses several tools to influence the credit markets: 1) the discount rate, which is the interest rate that commercial banks must pay when they borrow from the Fed. A change in the discount rate is likely to cause commercial banks to change the interest rates that they charge on loans made to businesses and individual borrowers. 2) The buying and selling of Treasury securities in the financial markets. These transactions have a major impact on the supply of money, credit availability, and interest rates. A large purchase of Treasuries by the Fed causes new funds to be injected into the banking system, which then has more money to lend, leading to lower interest rates. On the other hand, a large sale of Treasury securities takes money out of the banking system, causing banks to curtail lending by raising rates. 3) Public announcements by members of the Fed. For example, if a board member states that the Fed is concerned about rising inflation, interest rates are likely to rise in anticipation of the Fed’s efforts to restrict credit. •A loan’s term, or maturity length, generally affects the rate of interest that will be charged. Loans with longer maturities typically have higher interest rates. A thirty-year home mortgage loan is likely to have a higher interest rate than a fifteen-year loan on the same property for the same amount. And a five-year car loan will carry a higher rate than a three-year loan. In short, a longer repayment period places the lender at greater risk. •A borrower’s collateral can have a major impact on the interest rate charged by a lender. Collateral places the lender in a more secure financial position. In the event that the borrower doesn’t repay the loan, the lender can force the sale of the collateral in order to recoup any losses incurred. This lessens the risk to the lender, which should result in a reduced interest rate. Read more: http://www.finweb.com/banking-credit/the-cost-of-borrowing-money.html#ixzz3DivDYW00

Aug. 30, 2014

Tuesday Algebra w/ Financial Applications assignment

from:Hommen, Heather

to:Algebra w/Financial Applications

Please download and read this guide. We will compare and contrast this with Friday's assignment Wednesday in class.

www.daveramsey.com/blog/free-download-budgeting-guide

 

Aug. 27, 2014

Money Management Tips

from:Hommen, Heather

to:Algebra w/Financial Applications

Go to www.smartaboutmoney.com and read about the 10 tips. Write a description of the 10 tips.

Aug. 27, 2014

Friday assignment

from:Hommen, Heather

to:Exploring Chemistry

Students are to finish tcrossword puzzle on pg 16 if they did not complete in class on Wednesday. As well as the "What Do You Remember" section at the end of the chapter. 

Aug. 25, 2014

Fuel Your Dreams / Value of Money

from:Hommen, Heather

to:Algebra w/Financial Applications

Read the Fuel Your Dreams section of handout from Family File. Write out at least 5 personal goals that require money.

Aug. 22, 2014

http://www.spendster.org/

from:Hommen, Heather

to:Algebra w/Financial Applications

www,spendster.org choose the "shoes glorious shoes" video

Aug. 02, 2014

2014-15 Supply List - On-Campus Students

from:Administrator

to:All Students

This list is for on-campus students.

May 07, 2014

Friday reading

from:Hommen, Heather

to:General Science

Fridays reading is pages 393-398 

May 05, 2014

Final Review Part 1

from:Hommen, Heather

to:Biology

Review part 1

May 02, 2014

final review part 1

from:Hommen, Heather

to:Chemistry (H)

review part 1

May 02, 2014

algebra 2 final review part 1

from:Hommen, Heather

to:Algebra II

algebra 2 final review part 1

April 28, 2014

General Science

from:Hommen, Heather

to:General Science

Read pgs 355-358

April 28, 2014

Tuesday Chemistry

from:Hommen, Heather

to:Chemistry (H)

Read pages 436-439 and oyo 13.8

April 28, 2014

Inequalities

from:Hommen, Heather

to:Algebra II

Worksheet attached

April 21, 2014

Biology Tuesday

from:Hommen, Heather

to:Biology

Students are to read pgs 401-404 and do oyo's 13.1 to 13.14

April 14, 2014

Tuesday General Science

from:Hommen, Heather

to:General Science

Read pg 343-347 oyo 14.1-14.2

April 10, 2014

Friday Economics

from:Hommen, Heather

to:Economics

Read 218-222

April 07, 2014

Economics Tuesday

from:Hommen, Heather

to:Economics

Read pgs 193-197

April 07, 2014

Tuesday Biology

from:Hommen, Heather

to:Biology

Tuesday students are to read pages 361-366 stopping at The Crayfih's Respiratory System.

April 03, 2014

Friday Economics

from:Hommen, Heather

to:Economics

Read pgs 172-178 Skip the Think questions.

March 31, 2014

General Science

from:Hommen, Heather

to:General Science

We were scheduled to take a test in class today but we reviewed instead. They are to study for the test and the test will be on Wednesday.

March 31, 2014

Tuesday Lesson

from:Hommen, Heather

to:Algebra II

Monday we only got through lesson 75. Please do lesson 76 tomorrow and we will do lesson 77 together on Wednesday.

March 11, 2014

Economics Tuesday

from:Hommen, Heather

to:Economics

Sorry for late notice. We will review together tomorrow for the test since we were not able to on Thursday.  

March 03, 2014

Tuesday's Algebra II lesson

from:Hommen, Heather

to:Algebra II

Students are to work on lesson 69 for Tuesday March 4th.

Feb. 27, 2014

Chemistry for Friday

from:Hommen, Heather

to:Chemistry (H)

Parents, Students are to read pgs 319-324.

Feb. 27, 2014

Economics

from:Hommen, Heather

to:Economics

Parents, we revised tomorrows assignment due to fair preparations. Thank you for being flexable as they worked very hard on their booth display. Tomorrows assignment will be to read pgs 93-102. They do not need to do any THINK Questions.

Feb. 27, 2014

Algebra II for Friday

from:Hommen, Heather

to:Algebra II

Parents, The students have been instructed to do lesson 67 for Friday.

Feb. 19, 2014

Friday's General Science

from:Hommen, Heather

to:General Science

Hello Parents,

Our General Science home school assignment was completed in class today so the students are DO NOT have an assignment in General Science this Friday.

Thank You :-)

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