Welcome Florida School of Traditional Midwifery

March 19, 2012

Points added back to midterm

from:Woodard, Jackie

to:All Students

Hello Ladies,

I reviewed your Midterms again and gave back some points per our discussion. If you have further questions or concerns, please request a meeting with both Jackie & I. Thanks!

Kristen

Feb. 22, 2012

Take Home Exam # 7 for Wednesday, February 29

from:Woodard, Jackie

to:All Students

Please download and print the class assignment for Mid-Term Review on February 29.  I miss you guys and I hope to see you that day!  If you have ANY questions, do not hesitate to e-mail me.

Feb. 21, 2012

Olivia's Story

from:Woodard, Jackie

to:All Students

I am still smiling at my "healthy lungs" card. You guys!

Please remind everyone to check my postings on Think Wave.


Shellayna, I have a specific request of you. Olivia has a prenatal visit due of Thursday, 2/23. Would you (and another classmate of your choosing to work with) be responsible for a short (15 to 20 minutes) classroom/group presentation/prenatal visit. You may use role play, power point, discussion or any other resourceful activity. We just do not want to miss anything on her and I feel she has been a bit neglected. You can take the visit any direction you desire, just keep it "normal" as possible. There may be some pathology later on. Does she need more nutrition and water intake counseling? Her B/P was up a little the last few times, maybe some edema, does she need to talk about her delivery plan? Any testing due? You get the picture. Make sure that everyone is keeping up her chart. The individual student charts do NOT have to exactly MATCH (for example vital signs), but all of the elements should be there and when she has delivered, all 12 of you will have a completed record of Olivia's Story. Since Olivia has approximately 6 more prenatal visits before she delivers, after you finish her visit on Thursday, you can pass the baton of responsibilty for the next prenatal visit (3/15/2012) to anyone else in the class and they can run with it. The person you appoint gets to choose a partner. That way in six prenatal visits all 12 of you guys will have a go at it.

If you have ANY questions, please feel free to e-mail me.

Jackie

 

Feb. 20, 2012

OB Abbreviations

from:Woodard, Jackie

to:All Students

Let me know when you receive your list.

Feb. 20, 2012

Take Home #6

from:Woodard, Jackie

to:All Students

TAKE HOME EXAM   # 6
HealthCare Skills II SPRING 2012     _______________________________________________

• Varney 3rd Edition: Chapter 2 Basics of Management of Care (focus on the ROS for the Muscular-Skeletal)
• Jarvis:  5th Edition:   Chapter 22 (Musculoskeletal)
• Weaver 4th Edition:  Section II, pages 28 and 29.  CVAT and Clonus.


When speaking of physical exam, you have heard my mantra, “ALWAYS compare side to side”.  This is especially true when screening a musculo-skeletal complaint.  Keep in mind that you should inspect and palpate the unaffected or normal side first so that you have a basis of comparison.


• So we begin with inspection:    What are you looking for when inspecting or screening the MS system?

 

• Then palpation:  What are we determining during palpation?

 


• Range of motion:   Describe the difference between ACTIVE range of motion and PASSIVE range of motion.

 

 

Feb. 19, 2012

Vocabulary and abbreviations

from:Woodard, Jackie

to:All Students

Thank you sounds so inadequate, but be assured that I say it with profound sincerity.  The card is beautiful, cute, creative, heartfelt, and appropriately ironic!  I smile every single time it crosses my field of vision.  I know, I have said this to you guys many times, but as a group and as individuals, you continue to amaze me.  And believe me, I am NOT easily impressed and I do not give out superfluous or gratuitous compliments.
Now, for a little bit of business.    Somehow in all of this craziness, I remembered my promise of passing along a list of abbreviations. This excellent list of OB terms and acronyms was compiled by Robyn Mattox, who has kindly given her permission for distribution to FSTM students. The list is the best I have seen and contains useful, purposeful vocabulary you will use in documentation every day in your practice.  I will try to post it to ThinkWave later today or tomorrow.  I do not have Quiz 2 graded but when I do, I will post that grade to ThinkWave.  I will be sure to have the hard copy of Quiz 2 back to you in time to review for Mid-term.
My roller coaster ride has slowed but it is far from over.  I have been humbled by the experience and learned valuable lessons.  I am going to rest now.
Jackie
 

Feb. 15, 2012

Homework #5

from:Woodard, Jackie

to:All Students

SEE ATTACHMENT

TAKE HOME EXAM   # 5
HealthCare Skills II Spring 2012  NAME _______________________________________

• Varney 3rd Edition: Chapter 2 Basics of Management of Care (focus on ROS and                  examination of abdomen)
• Jarvis:  5th Edition:  Chapter 21 (Abdomen)


Label this abdominal graphic (ABCDEFG):  a. RUQ     b. LUQ     c.  RLQ     d.  LLQ  e. epigastic region    f.  umbilical region    g.  suprapubic region                 

 

 


Pregnancy causes many normal but symptomatic changes in a woman’s body.  In learning the techniques of physical exam, we have covered eight systems:  skin, peripheral  vascular, reproductive tract, breasts, HEENT and neck,  cardiovascular, respiratory and this week abdomen.  For each of these areas summarizes the physical changes that you and your patient might expect as the pregnancy progresses.    Use any reliable resource.

 

skin


Peripheral
vascular


reproductive

breasts

HEENT

 

cardiac

 

respiratory


Abdomen and
digestive tract

Feb. 10, 2012

DRAM

from:Woodard, Jackie

to:1222L HCS Lab II

Guys,

On my drive home last PM, my brain must have been working, although, I was zoning at the red lights!  The symbol you were asking me about is part of the apothocaries system of measure and it is call a "dram".  There are 16 drams in an ounce.  Hope this helps.

Jackie

Feb. 09, 2012

Triple Screen Test

from:Woodard, Jackie

to:1222L HCS Lab II

Triple Screen Test

ALSO KNOWN AS TRIPLE TEST, MULTIPLE MARKER SCREENING AND AFP PLUS
The triple screen test is a maternal blood screening test that looks for three specific substances: AFP, hCG, and Estriol.
AFP: alpha-fetoprotein is a protein that is produced by the fetus.
hCG: human chorionic gonadotropin is a hormone produced within the placenta
Estriol: estriol is an estrogen produced by both the fetus and the placenta
It is a non-invasive procedure done through a blood test with little to no known risk to the mother or developing baby.
What is a screening test?
It is very important to remember what a screening test is before getting one performed. This will help alleviate some of the anxiety that can accompany test results. Screening tests do not look only at results from the blood test. They compare a number of different factors (including age, ethnicity, results from blood tests, etc...) and then estimate what a person’s chances are of having an abnormality. These tests DO NOT diagnose a problem; they only signal that further testing should be done.
How is the triple screen test performed?
The triple screen test involves drawing blood from the mother which takes about 5 to 10 minutes. The blood sample is then sent to the laboratory for testing. The results usually take a few days to receive.
What are the risks and side effects to the mother or baby?
Except for the discomfort of drawing blood, there are no known risks or side effects associated with the triple screen test.
When is the triple screen test performed?
The triple screen test is performed between the 15th and 20th week of pregnancy although results obtained in the 16th -18th week are said to be the most accurate.
All pregnant women should be offered the triple screen, but it is recommended for women who:
• Have a family history of birth defects
• Are 35 years or older
• Used possible harmful medications or drugs during pregnancy
• Have diabetes and use insulin
• Had a viral infection during pregnancy
• Have been exposed to high levels of radiation
What does the triple screen test look for?
The triple screen is measuring high and low levels of AFP and abnormal levels of hCG and estriol. The results are combined with the mother's age, weight, ethnicity and gestation of pregnancy in order to assess probabilities of potential genetic disorders.
High levels of AFP may suggest that the developing baby has a neural tube defect such as spina bifida or anencephaly. However, the most common reason for elevated AFP levels is inaccurate dating of the pregnancy.
Low levels of AFP and abnormal levels of hCG and estriol may indicate that the developing baby has Trisomy 21( Down syndrome), Trisomy 18 (Edwards Syndrome) or another type of chromosome abnormality.
Although the primary reason for conducting the test is to screen for genetic disorders, the results of the triple screen can also be used to identify:
• A multiples pregnancy
• Pregnancies that are more or less advanced than thought
What do the triple test results mean?
It is important to remember that the triple test is a screening test and not a diagnostic test. This test only notes that a mother is at a possible risk of carrying a baby with a genetic disorder. The triple screen test is known to have a high percentage of false positive results.
Abnormal test results warrant additional testing for making a diagnosis. A more conservative approach involves performing a second triple screen followed by a high definition ultrasound. If the testing still maintains abnormal results, a more invasive procedure like amniocentesis may be performed.
Invasive testing procedures should be discussed thoroughly with your healthcare provider and between you and your partner. Additional counseling and discussions with a counselor, social worker or minister may prove helpful.
What are the reasons for further testing?
The triple screen is a routine screening that is not an invasive procedure and poses no risks to the mother or baby. The abnormal triple screen results often warrant additional testing. The reasons to pursue further testing or not vary from person to person and couple to couple. Performing further testing allows you to confirm a diagnosis and then provides you with certain opportunities:
• Pursue potential interventions that may exist (i.e. fetal surgery for spina bifida)
• Begin planning for a child with special needs
• Start addressing anticipated lifestyle changes
• Identify support groups and resources
• Make a decision about carrying the child to term
Some individuals or couples may elect not to pursue testing or additional testing for various reasons:
• They are comfortable with the results no matter what the outcome is
• Because of personal, moral, or religious reasons, making a decision about carrying the child to term is not an option
• Some parents choose not to allow any testing that poses any risk of harming the developing baby
It is important to discuss the risks and benefits of testing thoroughly with your healthcare provider. Your healthcare provider will help you evaluate if the benefits from the results could outweigh any risks from the procedure.
________________________________________
Compiled using information from the following sources:
Mayo Clinic Complete Book of Pregnancy and Babys First Year Johnson, Robert V., et al, Ch. 6
American Family Physician, American Academy of Family Physicians, http://www.aafp.org/