Messages

April 05, 2017

Measuring Blood Pressure

from:Keehan, Patrick

to:Anatomy - Night

MEASURING RESTING BLOOD PRESSURE
 

March 18, 2015

Keith's First Workout (MAS) - Feedback

from:Ampania, Christian

to:Individual Training - Night

As we discussed last night, I'm typing up my feedback here for future reference (I know we covered a lot and it's hard to remember it all)

  • I love that you had a specific objective for the workout (development of mobility, agility and stability) and would love to see it developed even more. One idea: separate each modality into their own circuits and spend a bit more time on each objective. For example, to develop agility you can include more ladder drills, cone drills, hurdle drills, etc and have that circuit be specifically dedicated to agility. The same would apply for stability and mobility. This way, you can get more work in for each skill you are trying to develop and force adaptation (progress) to occur.
     
  • Balance hack: as you stated, finding a visual point of focus is extremely helpful. Another cue is to have your clients dig their toes into the ground, like a tree spreading its roots deep into the earth. Ground yourself. 
     
  • You did a great job explaining the purpose of each exercise that you were having your group do. I really appreciate the fact that you had a purpose/reason behind what you were doing. For a long time, the industry standard has been to just tire people out and make them feel like they got their asses kicked. It's very easy to write a hard workout. It's not so easy to write a good workout. 
     
  • Get-ups are a bit complex to inplement into a circuit, this movement may have been better off on its own so the group could dedicate all of their mental and physical faculties to mastering this movement before moving on to something else. Another alternative would be to introduce the first part of the get-up (i.e. just getting to the position of being posted on your hand) for the first week or two before progressing through the full movement.
     
  • Try to minimize explanation time as much as possible. Say what needs to be said and nothing more. Coach as you go. "Simplify, simplify."
     
  • EXCELLENT job motivating and enouraging your group. Personality is a huge part of training, especially group training, and I think you really nailed this. 
     
  • Competition is a great way to get people to find their internal motivation and push themselves--especially team competition where another person/people are counting on you to perform. I loved it. Great thinking!
     
  • Not all "functional" movement needs to exactly mimic real-life movement. A close approximation will do and still help tremendously. We'll probably never encounter a situation in the world outside of the gym where we need to pick something even slightly resembling a neatly-loaded barbell up, but there's no doubt that barbell deadlifts (used in the appropriate situation at the appropriate time in the appropriate way) translate to our "real-life" functionality. Being stronger will help with everything.
     
  • You did a great job of staying on top of your group and not letting people slack off. People need that. Sometimes, that's specifically what they're coming for--that extra push. You delivered. 
     
  • You were on your group like a hawk watching and correcting faulty movement the instant you saw it--exactly what we want to see in any competent fitness professional. Way to go, sir. I'm very proud of you.