Welcome The Crowden School

Sept. 13, 2018

Rem Djemilev's 2018-2019 Violin Class Course Description

from:Djemilev, Rem

to:Music: Violin Class, Rem's

Rem Djemilev’s Violin Technique Class Curriculum 2018-2019 School Year Standards and Requirements • Establish good posture and physical coordination • Develop basic skills for correct pitch placement • The use of first position with different fingering patterns on each string • Bowing patterns on open strings, with simple rhythms, clear bow division, proper arm motion for detached strokes (detache), bowing near the bridge to produce a clear sound (sounding point), string crossings with single bows. • Bow hand exercises to create flexibility • Pizzicato, colle, and martelé may be introduced • Shifting to 3rd position and above may be introduced Examples of Scale Studies • Applebaum Scales for Strings • Whistler Elementary Scales and Bowings • A. Grigorian Scales and Arpeggios • Hrimaly Scale Studies • Sitt Scale Studies Examples of Etudes/Studies • Applebaum String Builder Bk.1, 2 • Applebaum First Position Etudes for Strings • Avsharian Fun with Rhythm • Avsharian Fun with Basics • Doflein Violin Method Bk.1 • Suzuki Bk. 1, 2 ,3, possibly 4 • Whistler First Etude Album for Violin • Wohlfahrt op. 38 Easiest Elementary Method Examples of Musical Repertoire • Applebaum Building Technics with Beautiful Music Bk. 1 , Bk.2 • Barber Solo Pieces for Young Players Bk. 1, Bk.2 • Suzuki Bk.1,2, 3

Sept. 07, 2018

8th Grade History Overview 2018 - 2019

from:Paxton, Greg

to:History, 8th Grade

Crowden Eighth Grade History - Greg Paxton, Teacher

Eighth graders will embark on an exploration of historical events that shaped America, with an emphasis on varied groups and their contributions to our society. Additionally, we will explore the tenants of the constitutional process, and analyze its relevance to current events.

Texts  - We will be using several resources including A More Perfect Union (Houghton Mifflin), along with various publications, articles, and editorials.

Format - Class consists of lectures and slideshows (with note-taking), with an emphasis on seminar-style discussion and reflection (critical thinking). Periodic labs and/or activities will integrated into the class discussion as well.

Note taking - Students will assemble a notebook of resources consisting of the main notes from class lectures, handouts, maps, and student-interpreted renderings. All students should have a spiral-bound notebook for notes, and a designated sleeved folder for handouts (preferably a binder to house all of these).

Research Papers - With an emphasis on critical thinking, students will sharpen research skills by gathering historical information, and then with Greg’s guidance, synthesize that information through written papers and/or reports. A rubric for each paper will be posted well in advance of the due date.

Class Projects - Class presentations, in the form of research projects, are designed not only to be a fun and creative, but also provide an opportunity for students to teach fellow students, as well as experience the dynamics of group planning (some projects are individual). Each project will involve submitting a proposal that I approve. Students are encouraged to use their imagination and creativity projects utilizing art, role-play, multi-media, model-making, and so forth, while balancing these formats with sound research. A rubric will be given for each project that details expectations. Some projects may also require a written component.

Homework and classwork - To what extent possible, I will strive to provide ample time for students to complete assignments as part of the class itself, though projects and research papers will need to be completed at home. When assigned, homework will consist of additional reading or research to supplement what has been discussed in class. Assigned research will either by followed by an assessment (quiz), or included as part of an upcoming test.

Tests and quizzes - Before each unit test or quiz, at least one period will be devoted to reviewing all materials for that unit (grades 6 & 7). Test dates will be posted on ThinkWave at least one week in advance. Study Guides will be assembled during the review period (a day or two before). During mid-terms and finals, either a test may be given, or a research paper may be assigned, depending on the class/unit.

Grading - Tests and quizzes are graded on a straight-forward point system. Research projects and presentations follow a rubric of required components. The main emphasis of both tests and projects is to ensure that each student grasps the historical concepts discussed in class, and that they can apply a measure of critical analysis to the facts.

Geography - Geography is taught concurrently with each unit throughout the year.

8th Grade Course Overview - Part One. Below is a sample of of the units covered in the first half of this year. Some units are taught chronologically, and some are thematic.

The Land - Geographical acclamation of the topography, and how/why this sets the stage for historical events.

Earliest Americans - An Introduction. This will begin an ongoing series of texts, resources, and discussion concerning the original inhabitants and their place in history.

European Exploration - The seeds of Commerce, Colonization, and Conversion.

Early European Settlements - Exporting European interests (and conflict) in the “New World,” as well as communities in exile.

The British Colonial Period - Detailed examination of the make-up of each satellite, daily life, and the pitfalls of being “ruled” from afar.

French and English Conflicts - And their impact on the residents of the “old” and “new” world.

Emerging Identity in the Colonies - Concepts of pluralism, immigration, and salutary neglect.

Religious Influences in the colonies - The intersection of the first “Awakening” and self-rule.

Pre-Revolutionary Ideas and Events - Rebellion against acts, the importance of printed pamphlets to spread ideas, and those who published these ideas.

The American Revolution - Declarations, geography of a non-certain outcome, emerging leaders of the rebellion.

Inside the mind of Jefferson - Influences on his own thinking, and the intent behind his words.

Early expansion in the Northwest Territory - Why this was important to a new nation.

Working It Out - The Constitution/Bill of Rights - Historical context for the “rule book” of democracy. The conflicts, compromises, debates, ratification process, and importance of state’s rights in seeking to amend it all.

Understanding the Constitutional Process (role of three branches) in an election year. - An overview of the separation of powers (its roots), and how this is playing out in current events. Creating a metaphor for the three branches, and the relevance of the Bill of Rights today.

Tests of Foreign Relations and U.S. Sovereignty. - The war of 1812, the Monroe Doctrine, and the emergence of Andrew Jackson as a “frontiersman.”

A Nation Grows - Westward expansion, Manifest Destiny, neoclassical revival, geographical differences in economics, more Great Awakening.

The Institution of Slavery - A timeline of events, exploration of histories, economic dependences, and the potential rupture to the union. Walter Dean-Myers: Now is Your Time.

Sept. 07, 2018

7th Grade History Overview for 2018 - 2019

from:Paxton, Greg

to:History, 7th Grade

Crowden Seventh Grade History - Greg Paxton, Teacher


Seventh graders will explore the medieval and modern world, with all its varied societies, empires, governments, art, culture, religious beliefs, ideologies, and technological advancements. Putting all of these into context is the primary goal of the course, with an emphasis on how all of these histories relate to our world today.


Texts - We will be using several resources including Across the Centuries (Houghton Mifflin), along with various publications, articles, and primary sources.


Format - Class consists of lectures and slideshows (with note-taking), discussion and reflection (critical thinking), and labs and/or activities to analyze historical documents and sources.


Note taking - Students will assemble a notebook of resources consisting of the main notes from class lectures, handouts, maps, and student-interpreted renderings. All students should have a spiral-bound notebook for notes, and a designated sleeved folder for handouts (preferably a binder to house all of these).


Research Papers - With an emphasis on critical thinking, students will sharpen research skills by gathering historical information, and then with Greg’s guidance, synthesize that information through written papers and/or reports. A rubric for each paper will be posted well in advance of the due date.


Class Projects - Class presentations, in the form of research projects, are designed not only to be a fun and creative, but also provide an opportunity for students to teach fellow students, as well as experience the dynamics of group planning (some projects are individual). Each project will involve submitting a proposal that I approve. Students are encouraged to use their imagination and creativity projects utilizing art, role-play, multi-media, model-making, and so forth, while balancing these formats with sound research. A rubric will be given for each project that details expectations. Some projects may also require a written component.


Homework and classwork - To what extent possible, I will strive to provide ample time for students to complete assignments as part of the class itself, though projects and research papers will need to be completed at home. When assigned, homework will consist of additional reading or research to supplement what has been discussed in class. Assigned research will either by followed by an assessment (quiz), or included as part of an upcoming test.


Tests and quizzes - Before each unit test or quiz, at least one period will be devoted to reviewing all materials for that unit (grades 6 & 7). Test dates will be posted on ThinkWave at least one week in advance. Study Guides will be assembled during the review period (a day or two before). During mid-terms and finals, either a test may be given, or a research paper may be assigned, depending on the class/unit.


Grading - Tests and quizzes are graded on a straight-forward point system. Research projects and presentations follow a rubric of required components. The main emphasis of both tests and projects is to ensure that each student grasps the historical concepts discussed in class, and that they can apply a measure of critical analysis to the facts.


Geography - Geography is taught concurrently with each unit throughout the year.


Course Overview - Below is an overview of the units covered this year, with a brief content description.


Part One


Early Travel and Cross-Cultural Connections. Modes of travel (150 - 1500), challenges,technological advances, and maps.


Byzantine Empire (Earlier Empire). The aftermath of the collapse of the West and the emergence of Constantine, Justinian, and the significance of “codes.” Also, and examination of the art and architecture of the empire, and an exploration of the intersection of religious belief.


Islam. Desert culture and the beginning of Islam; the life of Mohammed, the expansion of the Islamic Empire, its Golden Age, and concluding with the historical influences across the globe.


Africa. Early village life in Western Africa, the empires of Mali, Songhai, and Ghana, followed by the Bantu migration. From there were look at the rise of trading states, the Zimbabwe state and kingdom of Kongo. We concluded with an examination of the consequences of European trade.


Mongol Empire. And exploration of the culture of the Khans, their rise to power, and the meteoric expansion of the khanates.


China. The late Han Dynasty (Xian Di0, and its culture and technologies. We will learn about the political and social influences of Confucianism, Dao and Buddhism in China. Reunification of the empire (Wen, Tang, Sui) will be explored, as well as conflict with the Mongols. From there were conclude looking at the Ming and Qing dynasties.


Japan. The physical and human Geography of Japan, its early people, Chinese influence, and the emergence of Japan’s national culture (Kyoto). Then we look at the rise of feudalism and the power of the shoguns. We will also look at art and literature of the Kyoto court via role play.


The Mughal Empire. Geography. We explore Punjab, the Hindu and Muslim divide, followed by a brief explorations of Babur, Akbar’s multiculturalism (including Hindu integration), Jahangir and Shah Jahan. Art and architecture will be considered: The Taj Mahal and miniature painting. Hindu Deities will be explored in depth (well, the basics ones).


The Ottoman Empire. Ghazi warriors, Muslim expansion, the rule of Sultans, state organization, and the Janissary corps. Hopefully, a live classroom lesson (via FaceTime), live from Budapest!


Civilizations of the Americas. Mesoamerica: The Olmec, followed by a detailed examination of late-classic Mayan civilization, it’s cosmology, architecture, geography, and technological achievements. South America: Student-directed project on Inca or Aztec ways of life, after brief exploration of the Tiwanakan and Moche.


Part Two


Europe after the fall of the Roman Empire - the rise of feudalism, the growth of town, and the expanding power of the Church. Magna Carta deconstructed.


Western Europe under the power of the Church - Emerging conflicts with kings, the rise of the monastic life, universities (including influences from other cultures), art, and architecture. the significance of sacraments and cathedral-bulging on daily life will be examined.


Byzantine Empire (later empire). Trade, schisms within the Church, and the empire’s decline. The Era of the Crusades - Understanding the historical contexts of religious conflict, and judging it’s effects and history first on its own terms, then its impact on later eras.


Late Middle Ages and the Renaissance - The impact of the plague on social structures, central governments and monarchies. One-hundred year’s war, and emerging technologies.


The Italian Renaissance - Greek and Roman revival in art and culture; scientific thought and literature. The rise of Italian City-states, humanism, and the legacy of the Medici family and social classes.


The Renaissance in Northern Europe - How it differed from Italy; its literature, scientific emergence, art (perspectives), and the advent of printing.


The Decline of Church Authority - Corruption (indulgances), councils as threats to Papal authority, early Reformation leaders and emerging social/spiritual movements.


The era of the Reformation - Luther, the spread of Protestant ideology, the peace of Augsburg, Calvin and the concept of predestination in thought and theology. Then, the counter-reformation as a social and political response, including the inquisition.


Scientific Revolution - The emergence of methodology and hypotheses, how this conflicts the religious authority, and how it contributed to shifting world views and exploration.


Age of Exploration - Historical shifts, changing world geography from the explorer’s perspective.


Enlightenment Ideas - The historical impact of emerging ideologies and enlighten thinking in both Europe and the New World.

Sept. 07, 2018

6th Grade History Overview for 2018 - 2019

from:Paxton, Greg

to:History, 6th Grade

Crowden Sixth Grade History - Greg Paxton, Teacher

Texts  - We will be using a variety of resources including A Message of Ancient Days (Houghton Mifflin), and The World In Ancient Times series (Oxford University Press), as well as study guides from both of these series.

Format - Class consists of lectures and slideshows (with note-taking), time for discussion and reflection (critical thinking), and hands-on labs and/or activities (practical application).

Note taking - In class, students will assemble a notebook of resources consisting of the main notes from class, handouts, maps, and student-interpreted renderings. All students should have a spiral-bound notebook for notes, and a designated sleeved folder for handouts (preferably a binder to house all of these).

Research Papers - With an emphasis on critical thinking, students will sharpen research skills by gathering historical information, and then with Greg’s guidance, synthesize that information through written papers and/or reports. A rubric for each paper will be posted well in advance of the due date.

Class Projects - Class presentations, in the form of research projects, are designed not only to be a fun and creative, but also provide an opportunity for students to teach fellow students, as well as experience the dynamics of group planning (some projects are individual). Each project will involve submitting a proposal that I approve. Students are encouraged to use their imagination and creativity projects utilizing art, role-play, multi-media, model-making, and so forth, while balancing these formats with sound research. A rubric will be given for each project that details expectations. Some projects may also require a written component.

Homework and classwork - To what extent possible, I will strive to provide ample time for students to complete assignments as part of the class itself, though projects and research papers will need to be completed at home. When assigned, homework will consist of additional reading or research to supplement what has been discussed in class. Assigned research will either by followed by an assessment (quiz), or included as part of an upcoming test.

Tests and quizzes - Before each unit test or quiz, at least one period will be devoted to reviewing all materials for that unit (grades 6 & 7). Test dates will be posted on ThinkWave at least one week in advance. Study Guides will be assembled during the review period (a day or two before). During mid-terms and finals, either a test may be given, or a research paper may be assigned, depending on the class/unit.

Grading - Tests and quizzes are graded on a straight-forward point system. Research projects and presentations follow a rubric of required components. The main emphasis of both tests and projects is to ensure that each student grasps the historical concepts discussed in class, and that they can apply a measure of critical analysis to the facts.

Geography - Geography is taught concurrently with each unit throughout the year.


Course Overview - Sixth grade follows a unit-based narrative, beginning with early hominids, and ending with a detailed exploration of the Roman empire. Some of the topics covered will include:

From Early Hominids to Homo Sapiens

Early Cities of The Nile, Mesopotamia, the Indus Valley, and the Huang He valley

Early Middle Eastern Civilizations - Mesopotamia, the Sumerians

Cultures of the Ancient Levant - Their people, prophets, and kings

The Rise of Ancient Empires - Assyria, the Babylonians, Nubians

Ancient Egypt and The Rise of the Pharaohs

Ancient India  - The Indus Valley, Aryans, Buddhism and Hinduism

Ancient China and its Dynasties (including the age of Confucius and Taoism)

The Han Dynasty - And exploring the silk road.

Ancient Greece - From early Minoans, to the rise of the Greek city-state. art, culture, philosophy, deities, and war (Sparta).

Classical Greece - Government, archeology, social classes, and the Peloponnesian.

Alexander the Great - And the spread of Greek culture.

Rome - Origins, culture, technology, and rulers.

Sept. 07, 2018

Welcome 6th Grade to Mr. Greg's History class!

from:Paxton, Greg

to:History, 6th Grade

Welcome to all 6th grade students. Please refer to the Class Overview for more information. And, as always, feel free to email me with any questions or comments. 

It's going to be a great year! 

- Mr. Greg

Sept. 08, 2017

6th Grade History Overview for 2017 - 2018

from:Paxton, Greg

to:History, 6th Grade

Crowden Sixth Grade History - Greg Paxton, Teacher

Texts  - We will be using a variety of resources including A Message of Ancient Days (Houghton Mifflin), and The World In Ancient Times series (Oxford University Press), as well as study guides from both of these series.

Format - Class consists of lectures and slideshows (with note-taking), time for discussion and reflection (critical thinking), and hands-on labs and/or activities (practical application).

Note taking - In class, students will assemble a notebook of resources consisting of the main notes from class, handouts, maps, and student-interpreted renderings. All students should have a spiral-bound notebook for notes, and a designated sleeved folder for handouts (preferably a binder to house all of these).

Research Papers - With an emphasis on critical thinking, students will sharpen research skills by gathering historical information, and then with Greg’s guidance, synthesize that information through written papers and/or reports. A rubric for each paper will be posted well in advance of the due date.

Class Projects - Class presentations, in the form of research projects, are designed not only to be a fun and creative, but also provide an opportunity for students to teach fellow students, as well as experience the dynamics of group planning (some projects are individual). Each project will involve submitting a proposal that I approve. Students are encouraged to use their imagination and creativity projects utilizing art, role-play, multi-media, model-making, and so forth, while balancing these formats with sound research. A rubric will be given for each project that details expectations. Some projects may also require a written component.

Homework and classwork - To what extent possible, I will strive to provide ample time for students to complete assignments as part of the class itself, though projects and research papers will need to be completed at home. When assigned, homework will consist of additional reading or research to supplement what has been discussed in class. Assigned research will either by followed by an assessment (quiz), or included as part of an upcoming test.

Tests and quizzes - Before each unit test or quiz, at least one period will be devoted to reviewing all materials for that unit (grades 6 & 7). Test dates will be posted on ThinkWave at least one week in advance. Study Guides will be assembled during the review period (a day or two before). During mid-terms and finals, either a test may be given, or a research paper may be assigned, depending on the class/unit.

Grading - Tests and quizzes are graded on a straight-forward point system. Research projects and presentations follow a rubric of required components. The main emphasis of both tests and projects is to ensure that each student grasps the historical concepts discussed in class, and that they can apply a measure of critical analysis to the facts.

Geography - Geography is taught concurrently with each unit throughout the year.

 


Course Overview - Sixth grade follows a unit-based narrative, beginning with early hominids, and ending with a detailed exploration of the Roman empire. Some of the topics covered will include:

From Early Hominids to Homo Sapiens

Early Cities of The Nile, Mesopotamia, the Indus Valley, and the Huang He valley

Early Middle Eastern Civilizations - Mesopotamia, the Sumerians

Cultures of the Ancient Levant - Their people, prophets, and kings

The Rise of Ancient Empires - Assyria, the Babylonians, Nubians

Ancient Egypt and The Rise of the Pharaohs

Ancient India  - The Indus Valley, Aryans, Buddhism and Hinduism

Ancient China and its Dynasties (including the age of Confucius and Taoism)

The Han Dynasty - And exploring the silk road.

Ancient Greece - From early Minoans, to the rise of the Greek city-state. art, culture, philosophy, deities, and war (Sparta).

Classical Greece - Government, archeology, social classes, and the Peloponnesian.

Alexander the Great - And the spread of Greek culture.

Rome - Origins, culture, technology, and rulers.

Sept. 08, 2017

7th Grade History Overview for 2017 - 2018

from:Paxton, Greg

to:History, 7th Grade

Crowden Seventh Grade History - Greg Paxton, Teacher


Seventh graders will explore the medieval and modern world, with all its varied societies, empires, governments, art, culture, religious beliefs, ideologies, and technological advancements. Putting all of these into context is the primary goal of the course, with an emphasis on how all of these histories relate to our world today.


Texts - We will be using several resources including Across the Centuries (Houghton Mifflin), along with various publications, articles, and primary sources.


Format - Class consists of lectures and slideshows (with note-taking), discussion and reflection (critical thinking), and labs and/or activities to analyze historical documents and sources.


Note taking - Students will assemble a notebook of resources consisting of the main notes from class lectures, handouts, maps, and student-interpreted renderings. All students should have a spiral-bound notebook for notes, and a designated sleeved folder for handouts (preferably a binder to house all of these).


Research Papers - With an emphasis on critical thinking, students will sharpen research skills by gathering historical information, and then with Greg’s guidance, synthesize that information through written papers and/or reports. A rubric for each paper will be posted well in advance of the due date.


Class Projects - Class presentations, in the form of research projects, are designed not only to be a fun and creative, but also provide an opportunity for students to teach fellow students, as well as experience the dynamics of group planning (some projects are individual). Each project will involve submitting a proposal that I approve. Students are encouraged to use their imagination and creativity projects utilizing art, role-play, multi-media, model-making, and so forth, while balancing these formats with sound research. A rubric will be given for each project that details expectations. Some projects may also require a written component.


Homework and classwork - To what extent possible, I will strive to provide ample time for students to complete assignments as part of the class itself, though projects and research papers will need to be completed at home. When assigned, homework will consist of additional reading or research to supplement what has been discussed in class. Assigned research will either by followed by an assessment (quiz), or included as part of an upcoming test.


Tests and quizzes - Before each unit test or quiz, at least one period will be devoted to reviewing all materials for that unit (grades 6 & 7). Test dates will be posted on ThinkWave at least one week in advance. Study Guides will be assembled during the review period (a day or two before). During mid-terms and finals, either a test may be given, or a research paper may be assigned, depending on the class/unit.


Grading - Tests and quizzes are graded on a straight-forward point system. Research projects and presentations follow a rubric of required components. The main emphasis of both tests and projects is to ensure that each student grasps the historical concepts discussed in class, and that they can apply a measure of critical analysis to the facts.


Geography - Geography is taught concurrently with each unit throughout the year.


Course Overview - Below is an overview of the units covered this year, with a brief content description.


Part One


Early Travel and Cross-Cultural Connections. Modes of travel (150 - 1500), challenges,technological advances, and maps.


Byzantine Empire (Earlier Empire). The aftermath of the collapse of the West and the emergence of Constantine, Justinian, and the significance of “codes.” Also, and examination of the art and architecture of the empire, and an exploration of the intersection of religious belief.


Islam. Desert culture and the beginning of Islam; the life of Mohammed, the expansion of the Islamic Empire, its Golden Age, and concluding with the historical influences across the globe.


Africa. Early village life in Western Africa, the empires of Mali, Songhai, and Ghana, followed by the Bantu migration. From there were look at the rise of trading states, the Zimbabwe state and kingdom of Kongo. We concluded with an examination of the consequences of European trade.


Mongol Empire. And exploration of the culture of the Khans, their rise to power, and the meteoric expansion of the khanates.


China. The late Han Dynasty (Xian Di0, and its culture and technologies. We will learn about the political and social influences of Confucianism, Dao and Buddhism in China. Reunification of the empire (Wen, Tang, Sui) will be explored, as well as conflict with the Mongols. From there were conclude looking at the Ming and Qing dynasties.


Japan. The physical and human Geography of Japan, its early people, Chinese influence, and the emergence of Japan’s national culture (Kyoto). Then we look at the rise of feudalism and the power of the shoguns. We will also look at art and literature of the Kyoto court via role play.


The Mughal Empire. Geography. We explore Punjab, the Hindu and Muslim divide, followed by a brief explorations of Babur, Akbar’s multiculturalism (including Hindu integration), Jahangir and Shah Jahan. Art and architecture will be considered: The Taj Mahal and miniature painting. Hindu Deities will be explored in depth (well, the basics ones).


The Ottoman Empire. Ghazi warriors, Muslim expansion, the rule of Sultans, state organization, and the Janissary corps. Hopefully, a live classroom lesson (via FaceTime), live from Budapest!


Civilizations of the Americas. Mesoamerica: The Olmec, followed by a detailed examination of late-classic Mayan civilization, it’s cosmology, architecture, geography, and technological achievements. South America: Student-directed project on Inca or Aztec ways of life, after brief exploration of the Tiwanakan and Moche.


Part Two


Europe after the fall of the Roman Empire - the rise of feudalism, the growth of town, and the expanding power of the Church. Magna Carta deconstructed.


Western Europe under the power of the Church - Emerging conflicts with kings, the rise of the monastic life, universities (including influences from other cultures), art, and architecture. the significance of sacraments and cathedral-bulging on daily life will be examined.


Byzantine Empire (later empire). Trade, schisms within the Church, and the empire’s decline. The Era of the Crusades - Understanding the historical contexts of religious conflict, and judging it’s effects and history first on its own terms, then its impact on later eras.


Late Middle Ages and the Renaissance - The impact of the plague on social structures, central governments and monarchies. One-hundred year’s war, and emerging technologies.


The Italian Renaissance - Greek and Roman revival in art and culture; scientific thought and literature. The rise of Italian City-states, humanism, and the legacy of the Medici family and social classes.


The Renaissance in Northern Europe - How it differed from Italy; its literature, scientific emergence, art (perspectives), and the advent of printing.


The Decline of Church Authority - Corruption (indulgances), councils as threats to Papal authority, early Reformation leaders and emerging social/spiritual movements.


The era of the Reformation - Luther, the spread of Protestant ideology, the peace of Augsburg, Calvin and the concept of predestination in thought and theology. Then, the counter-reformation as a social and political response, including the inquisition.


Scientific Revolution - The emergence of methodology and hypotheses, how this conflicts the religious authority, and how it contributed to shifting world views and exploration.


Age of Exploration - Historical shifts, changing world geography from the explorer’s perspective.


Enlightenment Ideas - The historical impact of emerging ideologies and enlighten thinking in both Europe and the New World.

Sept. 08, 2017

8th Grade History Class Overview 2017 - 2018

from:Paxton, Greg

to:History, 8th Grade

Crowden Eighth Grade History - Greg Paxton, Teacher

Eighth graders will embark on an exploration of historical events that shaped America, with an emphasis on varied groups and their contributions to our society. Additionally, we will explore the tenants of the constitutional process, and analyze its relevance to current events.

Texts  - We will be using several resources including A More Perfect Union (Houghton Mifflin), along with various publications, articles, and editorials.

Format - Class consists of lectures and slideshows (with note-taking), with an emphasis on seminar-style discussion and reflection (critical thinking). Periodic labs and/or activities will integrated into the class discussion as well.

Note taking - Students will assemble a notebook of resources consisting of the main notes from class lectures, handouts, maps, and student-interpreted renderings. All students should have a spiral-bound notebook for notes, and a designated sleeved folder for handouts (preferably a binder to house all of these).

Research Papers - With an emphasis on critical thinking, students will sharpen research skills by gathering historical information, and then with Greg’s guidance, synthesize that information through written papers and/or reports. A rubric for each paper will be posted well in advance of the due date.

Class Projects - Class presentations, in the form of research projects, are designed not only to be a fun and creative, but also provide an opportunity for students to teach fellow students, as well as experience the dynamics of group planning (some projects are individual). Each project will involve submitting a proposal that I approve. Students are encouraged to use their imagination and creativity projects utilizing art, role-play, multi-media, model-making, and so forth, while balancing these formats with sound research. A rubric will be given for each project that details expectations. Some projects may also require a written component.

Homework and classwork - To what extent possible, I will strive to provide ample time for students to complete assignments as part of the class itself, though projects and research papers will need to be completed at home. When assigned, homework will consist of additional reading or research to supplement what has been discussed in class. Assigned research will either by followed by an assessment (quiz), or included as part of an upcoming test.

Tests and quizzes - Before each unit test or quiz, at least one period will be devoted to reviewing all materials for that unit (grades 6 & 7). Test dates will be posted on ThinkWave at least one week in advance. Study Guides will be assembled during the review period (a day or two before). During mid-terms and finals, either a test may be given, or a research paper may be assigned, depending on the class/unit.

Grading - Tests and quizzes are graded on a straight-forward point system. Research projects and presentations follow a rubric of required components. The main emphasis of both tests and projects is to ensure that each student grasps the historical concepts discussed in class, and that they can apply a measure of critical analysis to the facts.

Geography - Geography is taught concurrently with each unit throughout the year.

8th Grade Course Overview - Part One. Below is a sample of of the units covered in the first half of this year. Some units are taught chronologically, and some are thematic.

The Land - Geographical acclamation of the topography, and how/why this sets the stage for historical events.

Earliest Americans - An Introduction. This will begin an ongoing series of texts, resources, and discussion concerning the original inhabitants and their place in history.

European Exploration - The seeds of Commerce, Colonization, and Conversion.

Early European Settlements - Exporting European interests (and conflict) in the “New World,” as well as communities in exile.

The British Colonial Period - Detailed examination of the make-up of each satellite, daily life, and the pitfalls of being “ruled” from afar.

French and English Conflicts - And their impact on the residents of the “old” and “new” world.

Emerging Identity in the Colonies - Concepts of pluralism, immigration, and salutary neglect.

Religious Influences in the colonies - The intersection of the first “Awakening” and self-rule.

Pre-Revolutionary Ideas and Events - Rebellion against acts, the importance of printed pamphlets to spread ideas, and those who published these ideas.

The American Revolution - Declarations, geography of a non-certain outcome, emerging leaders of the rebellion.

Inside the mind of Jefferson - Influences on his own thinking, and the intent behind his words.

Early expansion in the Northwest Territory - Why this was important to a new nation.

Working It Out - The Constitution/Bill of Rights - Historical context for the “rule book” of democracy. The conflicts, compromises, debates, ratification process, and importance of state’s rights in seeking to amend it all.

Understanding the Constitutional Process (role of three branches) in an election year. - An overview of the separation of powers (its roots), and how this is playing out in current events. Creating a metaphor for the three branches, and the relevance of the Bill of Rights today.

Tests of Foreign Relations and U.S. Sovereignty. - The war of 1812, the Monroe Doctrine, and the emergence of Andrew Jackson as a “frontiersman.”

A Nation Grows - Westward expansion, Manifest Destiny, neoclassical revival, geographical differences in economics, more Great Awakening.

The Institution of Slavery - A timeline of events, exploration of histories, economic dependences, and the potential rupture to the union. Walter Dean-Myers: Now is Your Time.

 

Sept. 05, 2017

PE Course Outline 2017-18

from:Matteson, Teale

to:PE, 4th Grade, PE, 5th Grade, PE, 6th Grade, PE, 7th Grade, PE, 8th Grade

PE Outline 2017-18
from: Matteson, Teale   to:  All Students and Families


Physical Education at The Crowden School with Teale Matteson and Nori Grimes (Regular Substitute)

PE Units:
Soccer
Football
Baseball/softball
Posture/Breathing
Stretching/Toning/Breathing
Swimming
Tennis
Basketball (skills only, no games)
Table tennis (time and weather permitting)
Track and field
Balance Awareness/Proprioception
Dance or Martial Arts (if parent/teacher can teach or arrange a class)
Juggling (rainy day activity)
Nutrition and Health Issues—as related to Physical Education
Daily: Running/jogging and Pull-ups Push-ups Sit-ups or Crunches (Core Strength based on Pilates and “Primal Fitness”) Flexibility


PE Goals


Ensemble/Chamber Music is at the core of a Crowden Education where each voice is vital/essential/imperative to the group; so, too, in PE is every player's individual participation and teamwork.


Love of learning


Being engaged in the team environment, how and when to collaborate


Teamwork--working together in modes of communication: aural, visual, physical, intuitive.


Awareness of surroundings—visual, tactile and aural cues


Mutual respect


Increased confidence—being more comfortable in one’s body

Improving athletic skill sets, coordination, and the ability to have fun in contexts where they may not be at the top

Developing leadership—especially 7th and 8th grades


Improved posture and breathing


Sportsmanship


Street safety


Field trips—Cal athletics, collaborations with other departments, parent suggestions and help walking or driving kids to swimming, e.g.

Sept. 05, 2017

PE Course Outline 2017-18

from:Matteson, Teale

to:PE, 4th Grade, PE, 5th Grade, PE, 6th Grade, PE, 7th Grade, PE, 8th Grade

PE Outline 2017-18
from: Matteson, Teale   to:  All Students and Families


Physical Education at The Crowden School with Teale Matteson and Nori Grimes (Regular Substitute)

PE Units:
Soccer
Football
Baseball/softball
Posture/Breathing
Stretching/Toning/Breathing
Swimming
Tennis
Basketball (skills only, no games)
Table tennis (time and weather permitting)
Track and field
Balance Awareness/Proprioception
Dance or Martial Arts (if parent/teacher can teach or arrange a class)
Juggling (rainy day activity)
Nutrition and Health Issues—as related to Physical Education
Daily: Running/jogging and Pull-ups Push-ups Sit-ups or Crunches (Core Strength based on Pilates and “Primal Fitness”) Flexibility


PE Goals


Ensemble/Chamber Music is at the core of a Crowden Education where each voice is vital/essential/imperative to the group; so, too, in PE is every player's individual participation and teamwork.


Love of learning


Being engaged in the team environment, how and when to collaborate


Teamwork--working together in modes of communication: aural, visual, physical, intuitive.


Awareness of surroundings—visual, tactile and aural cues


Mutual respect


Increased confidence—being more comfortable in one’s body

Improving athletic skill sets, coordination, and the ability to have fun in contexts where they may not be at the top

Developing leadership—especially 7th and 8th grades


Improved posture and breathing


Sportsmanship


Street safety


Field trips—Cal athletics, collaborations with other departments, parent suggestions and help walking or driving kids to swimming, e.g.

Sept. 05, 2017

PE Course Outline 2017-18

from:Matteson, Teale

to:PE, 4th Grade, PE, 5th Grade, PE, 6th Grade, PE, 7th Grade, PE, 8th Grade

PE Outline 2017-18
from: Matteson, Teale   to:  All Students and Families


Physical Education at The Crowden School with Teale Matteson and Nori Grimes (Regular Substitute)

PE Units:
Soccer
Football
Baseball/softball
Posture/Breathing
Stretching/Toning/Breathing
Swimming
Tennis
Basketball (skills only, no games)
Table tennis (time and weather permitting)
Track and field
Balance Awareness/Proprioception
Dance or Martial Arts (if parent/teacher can teach or arrange a class)
Juggling (rainy day activity)
Nutrition and Health Issues—as related to Physical Education
Daily: Running/jogging and Pull-ups Push-ups Sit-ups or Crunches (Core Strength based on Pilates and “Primal Fitness”) Flexibility


PE Goals


Ensemble/Chamber Music is at the core of a Crowden Education where each voice is vital/essential/imperative to the group; so, too, in PE is every player's individual participation and teamwork.


Love of learning


Being engaged in the team environment, how and when to collaborate


Teamwork--working together in modes of communication: aural, visual, physical, intuitive.


Awareness of surroundings—visual, tactile and aural cues


Mutual respect


Increased confidence—being more comfortable in one’s body

Improving athletic skill sets, coordination, and the ability to have fun in contexts where they may not be at the top

Developing leadership—especially 7th and 8th grades


Improved posture and breathing


Sportsmanship


Street safety


Field trips—Cal athletics, collaborations with other departments, parent suggestions and help walking or driving kids to swimming, e.g.

Sept. 05, 2017

PE Course Outline 2017-18

from:Matteson, Teale

to:PE, 4th Grade, PE, 5th Grade, PE, 6th Grade, PE, 7th Grade, PE, 8th Grade

PE Outline 2017-18
from: Matteson, Teale   to:  All Students and Families


Physical Education at The Crowden School with Teale Matteson and Nori Grimes (Regular Substitute)

PE Units:
Soccer
Football
Baseball/softball
Posture/Breathing
Stretching/Toning/Breathing
Swimming
Tennis
Basketball (skills only, no games)
Table tennis (time and weather permitting)
Track and field
Balance Awareness/Proprioception
Dance or Martial Arts (if parent/teacher can teach or arrange a class)
Juggling (rainy day activity)
Nutrition and Health Issues—as related to Physical Education
Daily: Running/jogging and Pull-ups Push-ups Sit-ups or Crunches (Core Strength based on Pilates and “Primal Fitness”) Flexibility


PE Goals


Ensemble/Chamber Music is at the core of a Crowden Education where each voice is vital/essential/imperative to the group; so, too, in PE is every player's individual participation and teamwork.


Love of learning


Being engaged in the team environment, how and when to collaborate


Teamwork--working together in modes of communication: aural, visual, physical, intuitive.


Awareness of surroundings—visual, tactile and aural cues


Mutual respect


Increased confidence—being more comfortable in one’s body

Improving athletic skill sets, coordination, and the ability to have fun in contexts where they may not be at the top

Developing leadership—especially 7th and 8th grades


Improved posture and breathing


Sportsmanship


Street safety


Field trips—Cal athletics, collaborations with other departments, parent suggestions and help walking or driving kids to swimming, e.g.

Sept. 05, 2017

PE Course Outline 2017-18

from:Matteson, Teale

to:PE, 4th Grade, PE, 5th Grade, PE, 6th Grade, PE, 7th Grade, PE, 8th Grade

PE Outline 2017-18
from: Matteson, Teale   to:  All Students and Families


Physical Education at The Crowden School with Teale Matteson and Nori Grimes (Regular Substitute)

PE Units:
Soccer
Football
Baseball/softball
Posture/Breathing
Stretching/Toning/Breathing
Swimming
Tennis
Basketball (skills only, no games)
Table tennis (time and weather permitting)
Track and field
Balance Awareness/Proprioception
Dance or Martial Arts (if parent/teacher can teach or arrange a class)
Juggling (rainy day activity)
Nutrition and Health Issues—as related to Physical Education
Daily: Running/jogging and Pull-ups Push-ups Sit-ups or Crunches (Core Strength based on Pilates and “Primal Fitness”) Flexibility


PE Goals


Ensemble/Chamber Music is at the core of a Crowden Education where each voice is vital/essential/imperative to the group; so, too, in PE is every player's individual participation and teamwork.


Love of learning


Being engaged in the team environment, how and when to collaborate


Teamwork--working together in modes of communication: aural, visual, physical, intuitive.


Awareness of surroundings—visual, tactile and aural cues


Mutual respect


Increased confidence—being more comfortable in one’s body

Improving athletic skill sets, coordination, and the ability to have fun in contexts where they may not be at the top

Developing leadership—especially 7th and 8th grades


Improved posture and breathing


Sportsmanship


Street safety


Field trips—Cal athletics, collaborations with other departments, parent suggestions and help walking or driving kids to swimming, e.g.

March 23, 2017

Second Practice Midterm now available

from:McCarty, Dom

to:Math, 6th Grade

Here as promised is another set of practice problems for the midterm!

It is recommended that you work on them. It will not be collected, however.

Feb. 28, 2017

Scan of practice test

from:McCarty, Dom

to:Math, 5th Grade

Attached is the full practice test, most of which we covered in class.

It is highly recommend that you finish this tonight! It will not be collected, though.

Feb. 28, 2017

Test on Wednesday

from:McCarty, Dom

to:Math, 5th Grade

As we discussed in class, there will be a test on Wednesday. It will cover the number line, absolute value, and ratios, as well as converting between ratios, fractions, and percents.

Feb. 24, 2017

Test on Monday

from:McCarty, Dom

to:Math, 6th Grade

The test will cover addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division of integers, decimals, and fractions, both positive and negative.

It will also cover solving equations using addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division.

June 09, 2016

End of Year Newsletter

from:Mattson, Heidi

to:Homeroom, 4th Grade

Dear fourth grade families,

I can't believe we are almost at the end of our year together. It has flown by and I have enjoyed getting to know your beautiful children. Please find attached the last classroom newsletter. 

Warmly,

Ms. Mattson

P.S. The book present is a surprise!

Sept. 11, 2015

P.E. Outline 2015-16

from:Matteson, Teale

to:All Students

PE Outline 2014-15   
from: Matteson, Teale   to:  All Students and Families


Physical Education at The Crowden School with Teale Matteson

PE Units:
Soccer
Football
Baseball/softball
Posture/Breathing
Stretching/Toning/Breathing
Swimming
Tennis
Basketball (skills only, no games)
Table tennis (time and weather permitting)
Track and field
Balance Awareness/Proprioception
Dance or Martial Arts (if parent/teacher can teach or arrange a class)
Juggling (rainy day activity)
Nutrition and Health Issues—as related to Physical Education
Daily: Running/jogging and Pull-ups Push-ups Sit-ups or Crunches (Core Strength based on Pilates and “Primal Fitness”)


PE Goals


Ensemble/Chamber Music is at the core of a Crowden Education where each voice is vital/essential/imperative to the group; so, too, in PE is every player's individual participation and teamwork.


Love of learning


Being engaged in the team environment, how and when to collaborate


Teamwork--working together in modes of communication: aural, visual, physical, intuitive.


Awareness of surroundings—visual, tactile and aural cues


Mutual respect


Increased confidence—being more comfortable in one’s body

Improving athletic skill sets, coordination, and the ability to have fun in contexts where they may not be at the top

Developing leadership—especially 7th and 8th grades


Improved posture and breathing


Sportsmanship


Street safety


Field trips—Cal athletics, collaborations with other departments, parent suggestions and help walking or driving kids to swimming, e.g.

Sept. 07, 2015

8th Grade History - Course Description

from:Tillotson, Michael

to:History, 8th Grade

8th Grade World History:  History of the United States of America

• We define History and Historiography and examine their associated methodology.
• We will review the European exploration of the North American continent and European interaction with Native Americans with particular attention to geographical features and climate.
• We will investigate early colonial America as a foundation for the later development of of American institutions and track the evolution of political and economic relations with Europe.
• We will examine the forces leading to the War of Independence and carefully analyze the making of the U.S. Constitution, its provisions and its implementation in the context of the crises of American history.
• We will analyze the economic and social tensions that have characterized the American experience with particular attention to the lead-up to and aftermath of the Civil War, the effects of industrialization and the development of the nation as a global power.
• We will always be concerned with the implications our study of the past has for our present social and political concerns.

• We will make use of the textbook A More Perfect Union (Houghton Mifflin Social Studies) as guide for  our exploration of the past, but our principal concern will be to develop a classroom conversation between teacher and students about our studies, supplementing the textbook with material provided by the teacher in the form of lectures, handouts and research assignments.
• Students will be expected to take notes in class and on assigned readings and maintain a binder containing these notes and all other materials associated with the course.
• There will be periodic quizzes/tests announced and prepared for well in advance.
• There will be opportunities provided each student for classroom presentations based on research after consultation with the teacher.

• Grades will be based not only on quiz or test results, but also on an assessment of the individual student's engagement with and mastery of the material as demonstrated in participation in classroom discussion and in the precision and thoroughness of classroom notes.
• The ultimate determinant of the student's success will be:  what in the end the student has achieved, given the resources and opportunities afforded in the class.

Sept. 07, 2015

6th Grade History - Course Description

from:Tillotson, Michael

to:History, 6th Grade

6th Grade World History:  Prehistory and Antiquity

• We define History and Historiography and examine their associated methodology.
• We consider the origin of human culture and civilization with particular interest in technological and economic development.
• We study the first major civilizations in the Middle East, Africa, Europe and Asia, focusing on social, economic, political and cultural structures and their evolution.
• Particular cultures to be studied are those of Mesopotamia, Egypt, the Israelites, India, China, and especially, Greece and Rome.  In all cases, we will try to foster an appreciation for the physical, geographical and social conditions under which these cultures evolved.
• We will always be concerned with the implications our study of the past has for our present social and political concerns.

• We will make use of the textbook A Message of Ancient Days (Houghton Mifflin Social Studies) as guide for  our exploration of the past, but our principal concern will be to develop a classroom conversation between teacher and students about our studies, supplementing the textbook with material provided by the teacher in the form of lectures, handouts and research assignments.
• Students will be expected to take notes in class and on assigned readings and maintain a binder containing these notes and all other materials associated with the course.
• There will be periodic quizzes/tests announced and prepared for well in advance.
• There will be opportunities provided each student for classroom presentations based on research after consultation with the teacher.

• Grades will be based not only on quiz or test results, but also on an assessment of the individual student's engagement with and mastery of the material as demonstrated in participation in classroom discussion and in the precision and thoroughness of classroom notes.
• The ultimate determinant of the student's success will be:  what in the end the student has achieved, given the resources and opportunities afforded in the class.

Sept. 07, 2015

7th Grade History - Course Description

from:Tillotson, Michael

to:History, 7th Grade

7th Grade World History:  Medieval and Early Modern Societies

• We define History and Historiography and examine their associated methodology.
• We will study the development of political and social institutions in civilizations across the globe in the aftermath of the waning of the ancient world and in the emerging modern world of Africa, Asia and especially Europe.
• In particular, we will examine the rise and expansion of Islamic civilization in Asia and Africa and its interaction with evolving nations in Europe; the development of empires in the Far East and Sub-Saharan Africa; and in Europe, the transition from medieval feudalism through the Renaissance and Reformation to the Age of Enlightenment.
• We will give special consideration to relations between religious and scientific trends and the impact of technological progress and the development of political concepts and their implementation.
• We will always be concerned with the implications our study of the past has for our present social and political concerns.

• We will make use of the textbook Across The Centuries (Houghton Mifflin Social Studies) as guide for  our exploration of the past, but our principal concern will be to develop a classroom conversation between teacher and students about our studies, supplementing the textbook with material provided by the teacher in the form of lectures, handouts and research assignments.
• Students will be expected to take notes in class and on assigned readings and maintain a binder containing these notes and all other materials associated with the course.
• There will be periodic quizzes/tests announced and prepared for well in advance.
• There will be opportunities provided each student for classroom presentations based on research after consultation with the teacher.

• Grades will be based not only on quiz or test results, but also on an assessment of the individual student's engagement with and mastery of the material as demonstrated in participation in classroom discussion and in the precision and thoroughness of classroom notes.
• The ultimate determinant of the student's success will be:  what in the end the student has achieved, given the resources and opportunities afforded in the class.

Sept. 06, 2014

PE Outline 2014-15

from:Matteson, Teale

to:All Students

Physical Education at The Crowden School with Teale Matteson

PE Units
Soccer
Football
Baseball/softball
Posture/Breathing
Stretching/Toning/Breathing
Swimming
Tennis
Basketball (skills only, no games)
Table tennis (time permitting)
Track and field
Balance Awareness/Proprioception
Dance or Martial Arts (if parent/teacher can teach or arrange a class)
Juggling (rainy day activity)
Nutrition and Health Issues—as related to Physical Education
Daily: Running/jogging and Pull-ups Push-ups Sit-ups or Crunches (Core Strength based on Pilates and “Primal Fitness”)


PE Goals
Ensemble/Chamber Music is at the core of a Crowden Education where each voice is vital/essential/imperative to the group; so, too, in PE is every player's participation and teamwork.
Love of learning
Being engaged in the team environment
Teamwork--working together in modes of communication: aural, visual, physical.
Awareness of surroundings—visual, tactile and aural cues
Mutual respect
Increased confidence—being more comfortable in one’s body
Developing leadership—especially 7th and 8th grades
Improved posture and breathing
Sportsmanship
Street safety
Field trips—Cal athletics, collaborations with other departments, parent suggestions and help walking or driving kids to swimming, e.g.


Contact info
tmatteson@crowden.org, Pacific Soccer Training is also on Facebook
510-418-7148 cell for emergencies or off-campus contact

Sept. 09, 2013

Violin Class

from:Boloyan, Heghine

to:All Students

Please see attachment.

Sept. 18, 2012

Summary of Math Goals for 4th Grade

from:Mattson, Heidi

to:Math, 4th Grade

Problem solving is at the heart of our math program this year. Students will strengthen their understanding of numeracy and logic, learn how to interpret and become fluent in the language of math concepts, and recognize different applications of the material. Please see the specific outline attached in the Homeroom blog section.

Sept. 18, 2012

Summary of English Goals for 4th Grade

from:Mattson, Heidi

to:English, 4th Grade

Writing is the focus of the English program this year. Students will write on a daily basis.  Grammar, spelling, and other language mechanics will be taught as tools to express oneself clearly through writing. Appreciating the value of reading is another primary goal. Students will share independent reading choices and work with specific pieces in the classroom. Literature pieces are chosen to study several different genres, character analysis, and plot development, as well as to understand more complex vocabulary and understand literary techniques used by authors. Students will work through literature-based projects and writing pieces to understand process, increase fluency, and engage in meaningful discussion with others. Please see the overview attached in the Homeroom blog section for more detail.

Sept. 18, 2012

Summary of History Goals for 4th Grade

from:Mattson, Heidi

to:History, 4th Grade

Our year focuses on the history of California with particular emphasis on how the people and land have changed over time. The goal is to introduce the topic of history as a discipline, along with various techniques for delving into more complicated texts, and learn how to use notes to effectively understand what has been learned. Our yearly reflection will be: Every human being makes history. How will our understanding of the past affect the choices we make in the future?  For more details, please see the attached overview in the Homeroom blog.

Sept. 12, 2012

Welcome to Thinkwave from Ms. Mattson

from:Mattson, Heidi

to:Homeroom, 4th Grade

Dear 4th Grade Parents,

I am pleased to introduce our online assignment system to you. Here you will find long-term projects, tests and quizzes, and weekly homework. The 4th graders will always have their assignments written in their planners and on the white board in the Rose Room as well. 

Our main focus this first month is on learning routines, understanding how to take responsibility for one's own work, and crafting common language to support each other in a learning community. Our first few weeks of homework assignments are designed to ease everyone into a homework schedule that works for all of us. I will provide more information about homework and our curriculum on Friday evening. I look forward to seeing you all there.

We're off to a great start!

Ms. Mattson

Sept. 11, 2012

PE Course Outline

from:Matteson, Teale

to:All Students

Physical Education at The Crowden School with Teale Matteson


PE Units

Soccer
Football
Baseball/softball
Posture
Stretching/Toning/Breathing
Swimming
Tennis
Basketball (skills only, no games)
Table tennis
Track and field
Balance Awareness/Proprioception
Dance or Martial Arts (if parent/teacher can teach or arrange a class)
Juggling (rainy day activity)
Nutrition and Health Issues—as related to Physical Education
Daily: Running/jogging and Pull-ups Push-ups Sit-ups or Crunches (Core Strength aka “Primal Fitness”)

PE Goals

Love of learning
Being engaged in the team environment
Teamwork-working together
Awareness of surroundings—visual, tactile and aural cues
Mutual respect
Increased confidence—being more comfortable in one’s body
Developing leadership—especially 7th and 8th grades
Improved posture and breathing
Sportsmanship
Street safety

Field trips—Cal athletics, collaborations with other departments, parent suggestions and help walking or driving kids to swimming, e.g.

Contact info
tmatteson@crowden.org, Pacific Soccer Training is also on Facebook
510-418-7148 cell for emergencies or off campus contact

Sept. 01, 2012

Musicianship Level 2 Guidelines

from:King, John

to:Musicianship & Comp, Level 2

Hello Incoming class.

Welcome,

My name is John King and I look forward to being your Theory and Musicianship teacher for the year!!!

Below is a list of guidelines. Please feel free to contact me with any questions that you may have regarding the class. The best way to contact me (or for your parents to contact me) is through my email address, johnlawrenceking@googlemail.com.


Guidelines for Theory and Musicianship level 2.

My grading scheme is:

30% homework
~15% class participation
20% test
20% quizzes
15% interterm composition assignment

Homework

There will be 12 homework assignments this semester (2 grace assignments). Each one is due on Wednesday at 8:05 am (at the start of class). So, even if the assignment is finished
in class the week before, it still must be submitted on its due date. I will mark each for completeness and the thoroughness with which it is completed.
I will accept no late assignments (unless there is a note from a parent).

Each homework assignment should take no more than an hour to complete per week. Most will take less than 30 minutes.
I am very strict in how I account for homework. Out of a total of 1000 points for the class, each homework assignment is worth 25.

Similarly, it is required that each student bring the 3 ring binder handed out in class to store his/her papers in. There will be a lot of handouts in class.


Participation

To get full marks in participation on a given day,  each student must be seated at his or her seat with his/her 3 ring binder, pen and pencil, weekly planner and homework out (if Wednesday)promptly by 8:05. Also, he or she must wait quietly in line to be taken to the next class. In addition, if I have to ask a student to change his or her behavior more than twice (sometimes once) in a class period, then he or she will lose his or her participation points for the day. A detention will result in the student losing points for the week. Similarly, a student's in-class productivity will have an impact on the participation points received. Out of a total of 1000 for the class, each student can receive up to 4 points in participation each day. As 4 multiplied by 36 gives 144, there will be 6 free points given.


Test and quizzes.

There will be weekly musicianship quizzes. 
Out of a total of 1000 points for the class, each quiz is worth 15 points, the final test is worth 200 points. There are 16 quizzes; the lowest 3 scores will be dropped. As 15 multiplied by 13 gives 195, there will be 5 free points given.

Class time will be divided between 2 activities each day, Musicianship (sight-singing, rhythm work, and dictation) and Theory. Most Quizzes will be Musicianship based.


Interterm Composition Assignment
Out of a total of 1000 points for the class, this assignment, given 3 weeks of class time, will be worth a 150 points. Up to 30 points will be given for successful and timely completion of each of the drafts. The remaining 60 will be given for effort, effectiveness, and presentation in the final draft.