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Sept. 05, 2017

World Literature Syllabus!

from:Gardner, Riley

to:ENG 10 World Literature, ENG 11

LA 10 (Fall/Spring)  (ENG 11)
Instructor : Riley Gardner
World Literature

Course Description

This course is designed to deepen students’ experience with the study of human history across the world, by exploring literary texts that tell stories of human civilization. Beginning with the earliest recorded story on record, The Epic of Gilgamesh, students will consider the role of literacy with regard to human development; the art & craft of written expression; the impact of personal narratives & fictional stories, and their value to the historic record. 
Through reading, interpretation & analysis of diverse texts, students will improve their ability to comprehend & discuss the ways in which humans across cultures have used language to seek understanding and to share experiences. The texts also provide students with models for their own writing, which they will practice in essays analyzing texts, personal narrative stories, and blog entries. Regarding literary analysis, emphasis is placed on summarizing main ideas in fictional and non-fictional texts; identifying themes; and deciphering explicit & implicit meaning.
Writing and revision are integral components of this course. Students can expect a variety of writing assignments, including short & informal in-class reflections; short & extended research investigations; blog-post articles; and more comprehensive analytical and creative writing assignments. 
*Simultaneous enrollment in World History is not required.

Texts and Resources
The Epic of Gilgamesh
Siddhartha by Herman Hesse
Things Fall Apart by Chinua Achebe
Maus by Art Spiegelman
1984 by George Orwell
Selected poetry and short stories from across history.

Grading
Grading : tests- 25%,essays 25%, quizzes- 15%, classwork, homework - 20%, Contribution- 15%

Contribution/Participation
In order to have productive and meaningful class sessions, student participation in class discussion is essential. English as a subject is much more fun and immensely more meaningful when we can have quality discussions in class. A lack of contribution from students will not only result in a lower contribution grade, but also more “paper” (read: boring) assignments.
In order to learn a language, participation is the most important factor. Students should be ready and willing to join in conversation and discussion. Participation will also take into account students being prepared for class on a daily basis.
Students will receive a participation grade out of 3 points for everyday in class. The Grade will be based on the following rubric:

Points
Preparedness
Contribution
3
Student arrives to class prepared and on time, ready to learn
Student contributes meaningful comments and questions that are useful to class discussion.
2
Student shows up on time but is not prepared or visa versa.
Student makes some contributions, but leaves the instructor wanting a bit more from the student.
1
Student shows up late, and unprepared.
Student does not or barely contributes to class discussion.

 

Classroom Behavior
I would prefer to have a nice, open classroom where we can have lax rules and policies regarding food, bathrooms, technology, etc. If everyone can be responsible and behave as adults, I do not think this should be a problem. If the class proves that we can not be adults about these types of subjects, policies will be put into place to address these problems.

Assignments & Assessments
During the semester students will be given assignments that may be completed in or outside of class. Additionally there will be regular quizzes covering the topics discussed in class and assignments. There will be accumulative tests and/or final projects at the end of each quarter.

Tardy Policy and Being Prepared
It is important that each team member helps us stay on track with our daily schedule. Being prompt to classes is an important responsibility for each teacher and student. Students arriving late to class will be given two warnings. On the third tardy, the student will be “pulled off the water/rock” for 1 day. Any student arriving later than 5 minutes for a class will be “pulled off the water/rock” that same day, even if a previous warning had not been issued. Tardiness does not just mean showing up on time, but showing up prepared. Students will be expected to arrive at the beginning of class with all their school resources and personal needs met, and ready to participate.

Plagiarism and Academic Honesty
We strive for integrity and honesty in our lives… shouldn’t this extend to our academics? Plagiarism, or submitting someone else’s work or ideas as your own, will not be tolerated at World Class. Any plagiarism, cheating, or other forms of academic dishonesty will result in a zero or incomplete on the assignment/test, as well as facing potential academic probation or in some cases, expulsion from the school as seen appropriate by the WCA administration.

Respect and Expectations
The best education takes place where students feel comfortable to learn, express, and think in a safe environment. WCA students and faculty are expected to treat each other with respect and with an open mind. As a school our team will be varied in background, customs, beliefs, and ideas. This is one big advantage to our education. Please be respectful and treat others the way you would like to be treated. Encourage and support others… and they will do the same for you.

*** All of this is subject to change and adjust at the discretion of the teacher or administration of WCKA.

Sept. 05, 2017

World Literature Syllabus!

from:Gardner, Riley

to:ENG 10 World Literature, ENG 11

LA 10 (Fall/Spring)  (ENG 11)
Instructor : Riley Gardner
World Literature

Course Description

This course is designed to deepen students’ experience with the study of human history across the world, by exploring literary texts that tell stories of human civilization. Beginning with the earliest recorded story on record, The Epic of Gilgamesh, students will consider the role of literacy with regard to human development; the art & craft of written expression; the impact of personal narratives & fictional stories, and their value to the historic record. 
Through reading, interpretation & analysis of diverse texts, students will improve their ability to comprehend & discuss the ways in which humans across cultures have used language to seek understanding and to share experiences. The texts also provide students with models for their own writing, which they will practice in essays analyzing texts, personal narrative stories, and blog entries. Regarding literary analysis, emphasis is placed on summarizing main ideas in fictional and non-fictional texts; identifying themes; and deciphering explicit & implicit meaning.
Writing and revision are integral components of this course. Students can expect a variety of writing assignments, including short & informal in-class reflections; short & extended research investigations; blog-post articles; and more comprehensive analytical and creative writing assignments. 
*Simultaneous enrollment in World History is not required.

Texts and Resources
The Epic of Gilgamesh
Siddhartha by Herman Hesse
Things Fall Apart by Chinua Achebe
Maus by Art Spiegelman
1984 by George Orwell
Selected poetry and short stories from across history.

Grading
Grading : tests- 25%,essays 25%, quizzes- 15%, classwork, homework - 20%, Contribution- 15%

Contribution/Participation
In order to have productive and meaningful class sessions, student participation in class discussion is essential. English as a subject is much more fun and immensely more meaningful when we can have quality discussions in class. A lack of contribution from students will not only result in a lower contribution grade, but also more “paper” (read: boring) assignments.
In order to learn a language, participation is the most important factor. Students should be ready and willing to join in conversation and discussion. Participation will also take into account students being prepared for class on a daily basis.
Students will receive a participation grade out of 3 points for everyday in class. The Grade will be based on the following rubric:

Points
Preparedness
Contribution
3
Student arrives to class prepared and on time, ready to learn
Student contributes meaningful comments and questions that are useful to class discussion.
2
Student shows up on time but is not prepared or visa versa.
Student makes some contributions, but leaves the instructor wanting a bit more from the student.
1
Student shows up late, and unprepared.
Student does not or barely contributes to class discussion.

 

Classroom Behavior
I would prefer to have a nice, open classroom where we can have lax rules and policies regarding food, bathrooms, technology, etc. If everyone can be responsible and behave as adults, I do not think this should be a problem. If the class proves that we can not be adults about these types of subjects, policies will be put into place to address these problems.

Assignments & Assessments
During the semester students will be given assignments that may be completed in or outside of class. Additionally there will be regular quizzes covering the topics discussed in class and assignments. There will be accumulative tests and/or final projects at the end of each quarter.

Tardy Policy and Being Prepared
It is important that each team member helps us stay on track with our daily schedule. Being prompt to classes is an important responsibility for each teacher and student. Students arriving late to class will be given two warnings. On the third tardy, the student will be “pulled off the water/rock” for 1 day. Any student arriving later than 5 minutes for a class will be “pulled off the water/rock” that same day, even if a previous warning had not been issued. Tardiness does not just mean showing up on time, but showing up prepared. Students will be expected to arrive at the beginning of class with all their school resources and personal needs met, and ready to participate.

Plagiarism and Academic Honesty
We strive for integrity and honesty in our lives… shouldn’t this extend to our academics? Plagiarism, or submitting someone else’s work or ideas as your own, will not be tolerated at World Class. Any plagiarism, cheating, or other forms of academic dishonesty will result in a zero or incomplete on the assignment/test, as well as facing potential academic probation or in some cases, expulsion from the school as seen appropriate by the WCA administration.

Respect and Expectations
The best education takes place where students feel comfortable to learn, express, and think in a safe environment. WCA students and faculty are expected to treat each other with respect and with an open mind. As a school our team will be varied in background, customs, beliefs, and ideas. This is one big advantage to our education. Please be respectful and treat others the way you would like to be treated. Encourage and support others… and they will do the same for you.

*** All of this is subject to change and adjust at the discretion of the teacher or administration of WCKA.

Sept. 05, 2017

History of the Americas Syllabus

from:Gardner, Riley

to:History of the Americas

SS 11 (Fall/Spring)
Instructor : Riley Gardner

History of the Americas
 

Course Description

In this History of the Americas course, the focus is on the peoples of the Americas and the historical events that have shaped these two continents. While the history of the United States will have emphasis, the class will also look extensively at Latin America & Canada and how relationships have evolved over time. Close attention will be given to the specific places and regions in which students are travelling, in the form of Case Studies.
Reoccurring themes include expansion, migration, immigration & interactions between cultures; independence, liberty, & freedom; governments & foreign policy; revolutions; effects of technology; and human rights & social justice.
Throughout their studies of places, events, & peoples, students will build an understanding of historiography—the writing of history—and an awareness of the lens through which historians, themselves and others view history. This is achieved through ongoing critical analysis of historical sources & data, using the OPVL method.
  In addition to a host of primary and secondary historical documents, students will contact source materials such as videos and films, political cartoons, song lyrics and paintings, and the wealth of information available on the Internet. They will develop capabilities to comprehend, analyze, explain, interpret, organize, and present historical information, while also building empathy and understanding for peoples across time and space.


Texts and Resources
Excerpts from Lies My Teacher Told Me: Everything Your American History Textbook Got Wrong by James W. Loewen. 2007.
Excerpts & Film from Diamond, Jared. Guns, Germs & Steel.
Excerpts from A People’s History of the United States of America by H. Zinn
Excerpts from Modern Latin America by Thomas Skidmore and Peter H. Smith
Excerpts from Sources of Twentieth-Century World History by Overfield
Excerpts from IB History of the Americas Course Book. Leppard, Berliner, Mamauz, Rogers.

Grading
Essays- 40%
Homework/classwork - 15%,
Tests - 25%,
Contribution - 20%

Participation
Dialogue is a most important component to learning. Students are expected to participate in class discussions, and to support others’ participation in the class’s dialogue. In order to participate, it is essential that students read assigned texts, complete homework assignments, & bring the necessary supplies to class.

Points
Preparedness
Contribution
3
Student arrives to class prepared and on time, ready to learn
Student contributes meaningful comments and questions that are useful to class discussion.
2
Student shows up on time but is not prepared or visa versa.
Student makes some contributions, but leaves the instructor wanting a bit more from the student.
1
Student shows up late, and unprepared.
Student does not or barely contributes to class discussion.


Assignments & Assessments
Students will engage in a variety of learning exercises that will be completed both in and outside of class time. These will include maps, discussion questions, reading assignments, and short and sustained research assignments. To get the most out of the class, it is essential that students complete class assignments for their due date, as learning is cumulative and each assignment builds on the ones before.  Additionally, there will be regular quizzes and accumulative tests and final projects at the end of each quarter.

Tardy Policy and Being Prepared
It is important that each team member helps us stay on track with our daily schedule. Being prompt to classes is an important responsibility for each teacher and student. Students arriving late to class will be given two warnings. On the third tardy, the student will be “pulled off the water/rock” for 1 day. Any student arriving later than 5 minutes for a class will be “pulled off the water/rock” that same day, even if a previous warning had not been issued. Tardiness does not just mean showing up on time, but showing up prepared. Students will be expected to arrive at the beginning of class with all their school resources and personal needs met, and ready to participate.

Classroom Behavior
I would prefer to have a nice, open classroom where we can have lax rules and policies regarding food, bathrooms, technology, etc. If everyone can be responsible and behave as adults, I do not think this should be a problem. If the class proves that we can not be adults about these types of subjects, policies will be put into place to address these problems.

Plagiarism and Academic Honesty
We strive for integrity and honesty in our lives… shouldn’t this extend to our academics? Plagiarism, or submitting someone else’s work or ideas as your own, will not be tolerated at World Class. Any plagiarism, cheating, or other forms of academic dishonesty will result in a zero or incomplete on the assignment/test, as well as facing potential academic probation or in some cases, expulsion from the school as seen appropriate by the WCA administration.

Respect and Expectations
The best education takes place where students feel comfortable to learn, express, and think in a safe environment. WCA students and faculty are expected to treat each other with respect and with an open mind. As a school our team will be varied in background, customs, beliefs, and ideas. This is one big advantage to our education. Please be respectful and treat others the way you would like to be treated. Encourage and support others… and they will do the same for you.

*** All of this is subject to change and adjust at the discretion of the teacher or administration of WCKA.

Sept. 05, 2017

Opening day reading

from:Gardner, Riley

to:History of the Americas

WHY IS WORLD HISTORY
LIKE AN ONION?

THIS BOOK ATTEMPTS TO PROVIDE A SHORT HISTORY OF
everybody for the last 13,000 years. The question motivating the
book is: Why did history unfold differently on different continents? In case
this question immediately makes you shudder at the thought that you are
about to read a racist treatise, you aren't: as you will see, the answers
to the question don't involve human racial differences at all. The book's
emphasis is on the search for ultimate explanations, and on pushing back
the chain of historical causation as far as possible.

Most books that set out to recount world history concentrate on histor-
ies of literate Eurasian and North African societies. Native societies of
other parts of the world — sub-Saharan Africa, the Americas, Island South-
east Asia, Australia, New Guinea, the Pacific Islands — receive only brief
treatment, mainly as concerns what happened to them very late in their
history, after they were discovered and subjugated by western Europeans.
Even within Eurasia, much more space gets devoted to the history of west-
ern Eurasia than of China, India, Japan, tropical Southeast Asia, and other
eastern Eurasian societies. History before the emergence of writing around
3,000 B.C. also receives brief treatment, although it constitutes 99.9% of
the five-million-year history of the human species.

Such narrowly focused accounts of world history suffer from three dis-
advantages. First, increasing numbers of people today are, quite under-
standably, interested in other societies besides those of western Eurasia.
After all, those "other" societies encompass most of the world's popula-
tion and the vast majority of the world's ethnic, cultural, and linguistic

lO • PREFACE

groups. Some of them already are, and others are becoming, among the
world's most powerful economies and political forces.

Second, even for people specifically interested in the shaping of the
modern world, a history limited to developments since the emergence of
writing cannot provide deep understanding. It is not the case that societies
on the different continents were comparable to each other until 3,000 B.C.,
whereupon western Eurasian societies suddenly developed writing and
began for the first time to pull ahead in other respects as well. Instead,
already by 3,000 B.C., there were Eurasian and North African societies not
only with incipient writing but also with centralized state governments,
cities, widespread use of metal tools and weapons, use of domesticated
animals for transport and traction and mechanical power, and reliance on
agriculture and domestic animals for food. Throughout most or all parts
of other continents, none of those things existed at that time; some but not
all of them emerged later in parts of the Native Americas and sub-Saharan
Africa, but only over the course of the next five millennia; and none of
them emerged in Aboriginal Australia. That should already warn us that
the roots of western Eurasian dominance in the modern world lie in the
preliterate past before 3,000 B.C. (By western Eurasian dominance, I mean
the dominance of western Eurasian societies themselves and of the socie-
ties that they spawned on other continents.)

Third, a history focused on western Eurasian societies completely
bypasses the obvious big question. Why were those societies the ones that
became disproportionately powerful and innovative? The usual answers
to that question invoke proximate forces, such as the rise of capitalism,
mercantilism, scientific inquiry, technology, and nasty germs that killed
peoples of other continents when they came into contact with western Eur-
asians. But why did all those ingredients of conquest arise in western
Eurasia, and arise elsewhere only to a lesser degree or not at all?

All those ingredients are just proximate factors, not ultimate explana-
tions. Why didn't capitalism flourish in Native Mexico, mercantilism in
sub-Saharan Africa, scientific inquiry in China, advanced technology in
Native North America, and nasty germs in Aboriginal Australia? If one
responds by invoking idiosyncratic cultural factors — e.g., scientific inquiry
supposedly stifled in China by Confucianism but stimulated in western
Eurasia by Greek or Judaeo-Christian traditions — then one is continuing
to ignore the need for ultimate explanations: why didn't traditions like
Confucianism and the Judaeo-Christian ethic instead develop in western

 

PREFACE • 11

 

Eurasia and China, respectively? In addition, one is ignoring the fact that
Confucian China was technologically more advanced than western
Eurasia until about A.D. 1400.

It is impossible to understand even just western Eurasian societies them-
selves, if one focuses on them. The interesting questions concern the dis-
tinctions between them and other societies. Answering those questions
requires us to understand all those other societies as well, so that western
Eurasian societies can be fitted into the broader context.

Some readers may feel that I am going to the opposite extreme from
conventional histories, by devoting too little space to western Eurasia at
the expense of other parts of the world. I would answer that some other
parts of the world are very instructive, because they encompass so many
societies and such diverse societies within a small geographical area. Other
readers may find themselves agreeing with one reviewer of this book. With
mildly critical tongue in cheek, the reviewer wrote that I seem to view
world history as an onion, of which the modern world constitutes only the
surface, and whose layers are to be peeled back in the search for historical
understanding. Yes, world history is indeed such an onion! But that peeling
back of the onion's layers is fascinating, challenging — and of overwhelm-
ing importance to us today, as we seek to grasp our past's lessons for our
future.

J.D.

Aug. 30, 2016

Calculus Syllabus

from:Smith, Evan

to:Calculus

Calculus syllabus for your records

Aug. 30, 2016

Syllabus

from:Smith, Evan

to:Algebra II

Algebra Syllabus for your records

Aug. 30, 2016

Government syllabus

from:Smith, Evan

to:Government

Government syllabus for your records